Quantcast

Illinois’ Fiscal Breaking Points

by Ben VanMetre on September 6, 2011

in New Research

In a forthcoming paper with Eileen Norcross,“Illinois’ Fiscal Breaking Points,” we un-pack the current crisis in Illinois.

Our review of Illinois’ fiscal and economic indicators shows in addition to a $7.7 billion deficit in the state’s General Fund, Illinois faces $173 billion in unfunded pension liabilities as well as $70 billion in outstanding bonded debt.

To make matters worse the policies currently in place to keep state spending in check are loophole-ridden.  For example, the state has a balanced budget requirement but Section 25 of the State Finance Act allows the legislature to defer Medicaid claims and other payments into the next fiscal year in order to balance the budget.  This budgetary loophole has resulted in over $20 billion in deferred payments since FY 2000. The loophole is slowly being phased out as a budget balancing maneuver.

The recently enacted spending cap limits government spending to 2 percent of year-to-year growth in General Expenditures through FY 2017 and thus for the first time in Illinois’ history places limits on state spending.  However, as research by Mitchell (2010) shows, a TEL that limits budget growth to the sum of inflation plus population growth would be a much better option for the state.

Ultimately, Illinoisans have recognized that their state’s fiscal irresponsibility has resulted in a poor institutional environment and they are voting with their feet by leaving the state. Illinois lost a net of 1,227,347 residents from 1991 to 2009, the city of Chicago has fewer residents than it did in 1920, and the state consistently remains below average in its number of entrepreneurs.

In our paper Eileen and I argue that if the state of Illinois wishes to reverse this resident and business out-migration then the legislature and the Governor must stop focusing on revenue enhancements through increased taxation and borrowing and instead make serious institutional spending reforms.

Strengthen the state’s spending limit and balanced budget requirement, moving the state’s pension system to a defined contribution plan while also removing the constitutional protections to the current plan, and getting rid of tax incentive programs that target individual industries and/or activities.

Illinois is by no means a failed state. If the state continues to promote its growth enhancing policies, such as its flat rate income tax, while also taking the necessary steps towards institutional reform then Illinois’ future may not be as bleak as it currently seems.

Previous post:

Next post: