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Economic Freedom and Economic Privilege

Posted By Matt Mitchell On January 15, 2013 @ 12:14 pm In Economic Freedom,Government-Granted Privilege | Comments Disabled

Heritage indexLast week, the Wall Street Journal and the Heritage Foundation released their annual Index of Economic Freedom [1] by Terry Miller, Kim Holmes, and Edwin Feulner. I was delighted to contribute a chapter on government-granted privilege. I began by noting that despite the manifest evidence of a strong empirical link between economic freedom and economic prosperity [2], large numbers of people still lack basic economic freedoms.

In the latest edition of the Index, for example, 92 countries—home to nearly 70 percent of all of humanity—were listed as “mostly unfree” or “repressed.” Even among the freer nations such as the United States, economic freedom in recent years has been declining.

Why? I suggest two answers. The first is that ideas matter and we are currently losing the battle of ideas.

The second answer is more difficult:

Put simply, some entrenched interests benefit from the current lack of economic freedom and are prepared to go to great lengths to maintain the unfree status quo.

If this is not immediately obvious, it may be because the advocates of economic freedom often fail to emphasize it. Too often, those of us who argue for freedom highlight the fact that taxes are crushing, that regulations are burdensome, and that government involvement in the economy is an impediment to progress. While this is typically true, it is also true that tax dollars line the pockets of some well-connected companies, that regulations often allow some firms to profit at the expense of customers and competitors, and that almost every intervention in the market creates both losers and winners.

The chapter, adapted from The Pathology of Privilege [3], can be found here [4].

There are other interesting contributions from Robert Barro on “Democracy, Law and Order, and Economic Growth [5]”; James Roberts and John Robinson on how “Property Rights Can Solve the Resource Curse [6]”; and by Myron Brilliant on how “Good Business Demands Good Governance [7].”

Also, don’t miss Miller’s OpEd [8] from the Wall Street Journal. It offers a nice overview of the latest data and a summary of the chapters. Lastly, be sure to spend some time exploring the data and the website [1]. They’ve done a brilliant job of bringing all of this information together and presenting it in a user-friendly way.

My thanks to Heritage and especially to Terry Miller for the opportunity.


Article printed from Neighborhood Effects: http://neighborhoodeffects.mercatus.org

URL to article: http://neighborhoodeffects.mercatus.org/2013/01/15/economic-freedom-and-economic-privilege/

URLs in this post:

[1] Index of Economic Freedom: http://www.heritage.org/index/

[2] strong empirical link between economic freedom and economic prosperity: http://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/poleco/v22y2006i1p60-81.html

[3] The Pathology of Privilege: http://mercatus.org/sites/default/files/The_Pathology_of_Privilege-Final_2.pdf

[4] here: http://www.heritage.org/index/book/chapter-4

[5] Democracy, Law and Order, and Economic Growth: http://www.heritage.org/index/book/chapter-3

[6] Property Rights Can Solve the Resource Curse: http://www.heritage.org/index/book/chapter-5

[7] Good Business Demands Good Governance: http://www.heritage.org/index/book/chapter-6

[8] OpEd: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323374504578218062653964032.html?mod=rss_opinion_main

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