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Come learn about whether tax and expenditure limits work

by Matt Mitchell on June 11, 2013

in Tax and Budget

A few years ago I did a study on state Tax and Expenditure Limits (TELs). These are state rules—written into statutes or constitutions—which are designed to arrest the growth of state spending. New Jersey was the first state to adopt a TEL in 1976, and now about 30 states have some variety of TEL.

As I explained in a Wall Street Journal OpEd at the time, though fiscal conservatives have spent decades championing TELs, “these laws may actually be doing more harm than good.” The problem is that the most common variety of TEL—one that limits spending to some share of residents’ income—actually leads to more spending in high-income states. Not all TELs have this feature and my research suggests that the details matter. I found that TELs that limit spending growth to the sum of inflation and population growth, for example, seem to arrest spending in both high and low income states.

Now, Bemjamin Zycher of the American Enterprise Institute has revisited the question with an interesting and provocative new paper that reaches an even more pessimistic conclusion that I did.

Come to AEI tomorrow at noon where I and others will be discussing Zycher’s paper. Other discussants include Nicholas Johnson of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and Michael New of the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The event will be moderated by Mark Perry of AEI and the University of Michigan-Flint.

It promises to be a fun and lively discussion. Details here.

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