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Washington DC is set to become the latest city to make it illegal for low-skill people to work

by Adam Millsap on June 8, 2016

in City Life, Economic Policy, Minimum Wage, Unemployment

In the latest example of politics trumping economics, Washington DC’s city council voted to increase the city’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020. The economic arguments against a minimum wage are well-known to most people so I won’t rehash them here, but if you want to read more about why the minimum wage is bad policy you can do so here, here, and here.

In a nutshell, the minimum wage prices lower-skill workers out of the market by setting the wage higher than the value they can produce for their employer; if a worker only produces $9 worth of value in an hour an employer can’t pay her $10 per hour and stay in business.

The minimum wage has the strongest impact on low-skill workers since they tend to produce the least amount of value for their employers. Two categories of such workers are teenagers, who lack experience and have yet to finish their education, and adults with less than a high school degree. The figures below depict the employment and unemployment rates for these two groups in the Washington DC metro area (MSA) and the city proper (District only) from 2009 to 2014 (most recent data available) using 5-year American Community Survey data from American FactFinder.

DC 16-19 employed

As shown in the figure only about 15% of DC’s 16 – 19 year olds were employed (orange) in 2014 compared to about 25% in the MSA as a whole. The percentage has fallen since 2009 and doesn’t appear to be recovering. Increasing the price of such workers certainly won’t help.

The next figure shows the percentage of people with less than a high school degree who were employed.

DC less HS employed

Again, the percentage has fallen in DC since 2009 and is far below the MSA as a whole. Less than half of adults with less than a high school degree are employed in DC compared to 67% in the Washington metro area. If employers relocate to other jurisdictions within the MSA once the minimum wage law takes effect it will make it more difficult for the less-educated adults of DC to find a job.

The next two figures show the unemployment rates for both groups in both areas. As shown, the unemployment rate is higher in DC than in the MSA for both groups and has been trending upward since 2009.

DC 16-19 unemp

DC less HS unemp

It’s outlandish to think that raising the minimum wage will improve things for the 35% of 16 – 19 year olds and 21% of high school dropouts who were looking for a job and couldn’t find one under the old minimum wage of only $9.50.

Politicians and voters are free to ignore economic reality and base their decision making on good intentions, but when doing so they should at least know the employment facts and be made aware of the futility of their intentions. I predict that we will see more automation in DC’s restaurants, hotels, and bars in the future as workers get relatively more expensive due to the higher minimum wage. This will only make it harder for DC’s teenagers and less-educated residents to find work, which as shown above is already a difficult task.

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