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Women are driving recent increase in age 25-54 labor force participation

by Adam Millsap on October 7, 2016

in Economic Policy, Unemployment

Josh Zumbrun from the WSJ posted some interesting labor market charts that use data from today’s September jobs report. The one that jumped out at me was the one below, which shows the prime-age (age 25-54) employment and labor force participation (LFP) rate.

wsj-prime-age-sept-16-prime-age-lfp

In a related tweet he notes that the 25 – 54 LFP rate is up nearly 1 percentage point in the last year. The exact number is 0.9 from Sept. 2015 to Sept. 2016, and in the figure above you can clearly see an increase in the blue line at the end. So does this mean we are finally seeing a recovery in the prime age LFP rate? Yes and no.

I dug a little deeper and females appear to be driving most of the trend. The figure below shows the prime age male and female LFP rates from Jan. 2006 to the Sept. 2016. (Female data series LNS11300062 and male series LNS11300061)

oct-female-male-lfp-rate-1-06-9-16

As shown in the figure, the female LFP rate (orange line) appears to be steadily increasing since September of last year while the male LFP rate (blue line) is flatter. To get a better look, the following figure zooms in on the period January 2015 to September 2016 and adds a linear trend line.

oct-male-female-lfp-rate-1-15-9-16

The female LFP rate does appear to be trending up since the beginning of last year, but the male line is essentially flat.

Much has been made about the short-term and long-term decline of the prime-age male LFP rate. President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors wrote an entire report about it, and economists such as Larry Summers have recently said that figuring out why males are dropping out of the labor force and what to do about it is “vital to our future”.

The recent uptick in the overall prime-age LFP rate is a good sign, but it appears to be largely driven by women. I think it’s still too early to say that the LFP rate of prime-age men has started to improve, and what this means for the future is still unknown.

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