Quantcast

Three ways states can improve their health care markets

March 18, 2015

I have a new essay, coauthored with two of my former students, Anna Mills and Dana Williams. We just published a piece in Real Clear Policy summarizing it. Here is a selection of the OpEd: Liberals, conservative, and libertarians agree on the goals: Patients should have access to innovative, low-cost, and high-quality care. And though […]

Read the full post →

What is rent seeking? Ask the dino-hunters.

March 9, 2015

I haven’t had much time for blogging lately but I’m going to try to get back into the swing of things. Back in December, I had this to say in Real Clear Markets: The eminent political economist (and my former professor) Gordon Tullock, passed away last month at the age of 92. His greatest contribution to […]

Read the full post →

The Sharing Economy and Consumer Protection

January 7, 2015

(It has been a busy few weeks and I haven’t had much time for blogging). In early December, my colleagues Chris Koopman, Adam Thierer, and I published a piece on the sharing economy and consumer protection regulation. Here is a summary. A few days later, I was on the Diane Rehm Show talking about the […]

Read the full post →

What to expect from a lame duck

November 25, 2014

Two weeks ago, I sat down with CSPAN’s Greta Wodele Brawner to talk about “lame duck” sessions of Congress. Drawing on my research with colleagues Chris Koopman and Emily Washington, we discussed the ways in which roll call voting patterns differ during lame duck sessions compared with ordinary sessions. A few times I struck a […]

Read the full post →

An interesting development in state regulation of wine shipment

November 18, 2014
Thumbnail image for An interesting development in state regulation of wine shipment

Can one state enforce another state’s laws that prohibit direct-to-consumer wine shipment from out-of-state retailers while allowing it by in-state retailers?  That’s the question posed in a recent New York case. The New York State Liquor Authority has a rule that prohibits licensees from engaging in “improper conduct.”  The liquor regulator argues that direct shipments […]

Read the full post →

The Sharing Economy

September 30, 2014

Over at the Tech Liberation Front, my colleague Adam Thierer has sketched out a few themes in the debate over the sharing economy. His discussion of leveling the regulatory playing field is particularly important. Here is my favorite part: Alternative remedies exist: Accidents will always happen, of course. But insurance, contracts, product liability, and other […]

Read the full post →

How Complete Are Federal Agencies’ Regulatory Analyses?

September 12, 2014

A report released yesterday by the Government Accountability Office will likely get spun to imply that federal agencies are doing a pretty good job of assessing the benefits and costs of their proposed regulations. The subtitle of the report reads in part, “Agencies Included Key Elements of Cost-Benefit Analysis…” Unfortunately, agency analyses of regulations are less […]

Read the full post →

North Carolina Reconsiders its Rejection of Corporate Welfare

September 2, 2014

A couple of weeks ago, something surprising happened in North Carolina. As the Carolina Journal explained: RALEIGH — Twenty-eight House Republicans bolted party ranks Tuesday, joining 26 Democrats to defeat an economic incentives program that some labeled “corporate welfare.” It was a rebuke to House Speaker Thom Tillis, R-Mecklenburg, Senate leader Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, and […]

Read the full post →

Ex-Im in 5 Minutes

August 26, 2014

What is Ex-Im? What does it do? Is it, on net, a good deal for the U.S.? Here is my attempt to answer these questions in five minutes. Many thanks to the multi-talented Charles Blatz for making this possible.

Read the full post →

Paving over pension liabilities, again

August 18, 2014

Public sector pensions are subject to a variety of accounting and actuarial manipulations. A lot of the reason for the lack of funding discipline, I’ve argued, is in part due to the mal-incentives in the public sector to fully fund employee pensions. Discount rate assumptions, asset smoothing, and altering amortization schedules are three of the […]

Read the full post →