Reforming State and Local Pension Plans

The Government Accountability Office recently issued a report that provides a nice analysis on the changes that have been taking place in state and local pension plans over the past few years. According to the GAO’s tabulations, the following reforms have been implemented since 2008:

 • Reducing benefits: 35 states have reduced pension benefits, mostly for future employees due to legal provisions protecting benefits for current employees and retirees. A few states, like Colorado, have reduced post-retirement benefit increases for all members and beneficiaries of their pension plans.

• Increasing member contributions: Half of the states have increased member contributions, thereby shifting a larger share of pension costs to employees.

• Switching to a hybrid approach: Georgia, Michigan, and Utah recently implemented hybrid approaches, which incorporate a defined contribution plan component, shifting some investment risk to employees.

The reforms listed in this report seem to indicate that some states and localities are taking a step in the right direction in regards to pension reform. There is, however, a lot more work that needs to be done. One reform, for example, that we need to see more of is shifting public sector pensions from defined benefit to defined contribution plans (see Scott Beaulier’s recent paper for more on this topic). As the GAO report points out, roughly 78 percent of state and local employees participated in defined benefit plans in 2011 – compared to 18 percent of private sector employees.

Another important topic that this report touches on is the discount rate debate. That is, whether or not states should base the discount rate on the expected return of plan assets or on relevant interest rates in the bond market (Eileen Norcross has done some valuable research on this topic here and here).

 

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About Ben VanMetre

Ben VanMetre is an MA Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Before joining Mercatus, Ben earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Beloit College where he double majored in Economics and Management and Psychology. His research interests include international and state-based development issues, entrepreneurship, institutional arrangements, and economic freedom. His work has appeared in Forbes, Economic Affairs, the Cato Journal, the Journal of Business and Economic Perspectives, the Journal of the James Madison Institute, the Free Market Foundation, and the second volume of the Wealth and Wellbeing of Nations.