Category Archives: Regulation

Many working-age males aren’t working: What should be done?

The steady disappearance of prime-age males (age 25-54) from the labor force has been occurring for decades and has recently become popular in policy circles. The prime-age male labor force participation rate began falling in the 1950s, and since January 1980 the percent of prime-age males not in the labor force has increased from 5.5% to 12.3%. In fact, since the economy started recovering from our latest recession in June 2009 the rate has increased by 1.3 percentage points.

The 12.3% of prime-age males not in the labor force nationwide masks substantial variation at the state level. The figure below shows the percentage of prime-age males not in the labor force—neither working nor looking for a job—by state in 2016 according to data from the Current Population Survey.

25-54 males NILF by state 2016

The lowest percentage was in Wyoming, where only 6.3% of prime males were out of the labor force. On the other end of the spectrum, over 20% of prime males were out of the labor force in West Virginia and Mississippi, a shocking number. Remember, prime-age males are generally not of school age and too young to retire, so the fact that one out of every five is not working or even looking for a job in some states is hard to fathom.

Several researchers have investigated the absence of these men from the labor force and there is some agreement on the cause. First, demand side factors play a role. The decline of manufacturing, traditionally a male dominated industry, reduced the demand for their labor. In a state like West Virginia, the decline of coal mining—another male dominated industry—has contributed as well.

Some of the most recent decline is due to less educated men dropping out as the demand for their skills continues to fall. Geographic mobility has also declined, so even when an adjacent state has a stronger labor market according to the figure above—for example West Virginia and Maryland—people aren’t moving to take advantage of it.

Of course, people lose jobs all the time yet most find another one. Moreover, if someone isn’t working, how do they support themselves? The long-term increase in female labor force participation has allowed some men to rely on their spouse for income. Other family members and friends may also help. There is also evidence that men are increasingly relying on government aid, such as disability insurance, to support themselves.

These last two reasons, relying on a family member’s income or government aid, are supply-side reasons, since they affect a person’s willingness to accept a job rather than the demand for a person’s labor. A report by Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors argued that supply-side reasons were only a small part of the decline in the prime-age male labor force participation rate and that the lack of demand was the real culprit:

“Reductions in labor supply—in other words, prime-age men choosing not to work for a given set of labor market conditions—explain relatively little of the long-run trend…In contrast, reductions in the demand for labor, especially for lower-skilled men, appear to be an important component of the decline in prime-age male labor force participation.”

Other researchers, however, are less convinced. For example, AEI’s Nicholas Eberstadt thinks that supply-side factors play a larger role than the CEA acknowledges and he discusses these in his book Men Without Work. One piece of evidence he notes is the different not-in-labor-force (NILF) rates of native born and foreign born prime-age males: Since one would think that structural demand shocks would affect both native and foreign-born alike, the difference indicates that some other factor may be at work.

In the figure below, I subtract the foreign born not-in-labor-force rate from the native born rate by state. A positive number means that native prime-age males are less likely to be in the labor force than foreign-born prime age males. (Note: Foreign born only means a person was born in a country other than the U.S.: It does not mean that the person is not a citizen at the time the data was collected.)

25-54 native, foreign NILF diff

As shown in the figure, natives are less likely to be in the labor force (positive bar) in 34 of the 51 areas (DC included). For example, in Texas the percent of native prime-age men not in the labor force is 12.9% and the percentage of foreign-born not in the labor force is 5.9%, a 7 percentage point gap, which is what’s displayed in the figure above.

The difference in the NILF rate between the two groups is also striking when broken down by education, as shown in the next figure.

25-54 native, foreign males NILF by educ

In 2016, natives with less than a high school degree were four times more likely to be out of the labor force than foreign born, while natives with a high school degree were twice as likely to be out of the labor force. The NILF rates for some college or a bachelor’s or more are similar.

Mr. Eberstadt attributes some of this difference to the increase in incarceration rates since the 1970s. The U.S. imprisons a higher percentage of its population than almost any other country and it is very difficult to find a job with an arrest record or a conviction.

There aren’t much data combining employment and criminal history so it is hard to know exactly how much of a role crime plays in the difference between the NILF rates by education. Mr. Eberstadt provides some evidence in his book that shows that men with an arrest or conviction are much more likely to be out of the labor force than similar men without, but it is not perfectly comparable to the usual BLS data. That being said, it is reasonable to think that the mass incarceration of native prime-age males, primarily those with little formal education, has created a large group of unemployable, and thus unemployed, men.

Is incarceration a supply or demand side issue? On one hand, people with a criminal record are not really in demand, so in that sense it’s a demand issue. On the other hand, crime is a choice in many instances—people may choose a life of crime over other, non-criminal professions because it pays a higher wage than other available options or it somehow provides them with a more fulfilling life (e.g. Tony Soprano). In this sense crime and any subsequent incarceration is the result of a supply-side choice. Drug use that results in incarceration could also be thought of this way. I will let the reader decide which is more relevant to the NILF rates of prime-age males.

Criminal justice reform in the sense of fewer arrests and incarcerations would likely improve the prime-age male LFP rate, but the results would take years to show up in the data since such reforms don’t help the many men who have already served their time and want to work but are unable to find a job. Reforms that make it easier for convicted felons to find work would offer more immediate help, and there has been some efforts in this area. How successful they will be remains to be seen.

Other state reforms such as less occupational licensing would make it easier for people— including those with criminal convictions—to enter certain professions. There are also several ideas floating around that would make it easier for people to move to areas with better labor markets, such as making it easier to transfer unemployment benefits across state lines.

More economic growth would alleviate much of the demand side issues, and tax reform and reducing regulation would help on this front.

But has something fundamentally changed the way some men view work? Would some, especially the younger ones, rather just live with their parents and play video games, as economist Erik Hurst argues? For those wanting to learn more about this issue, Mr. Eberstadt’s book is a good place to start.

Innovation and economic growth in the early 20th century and lessons for today

Economic growth is vital for improving our lives and the primary long-run determinant of economic growth is innovation. More innovation means better products, more choices for consumers and a higher standard of living. Worldwide, hundreds of millions of people have been lifted out of poverty due to the economic growth that has occurred in many countries since the 1970s.

The effect of innovation on economic growth has been heavily analyzed using data from the post-WWII period, but there is considerably less work that examines the relationship between innovation and economic growth during earlier time periods. An interesting new working paper by Ufuk Akcigit, John Grigsby and Tom Nicholas that examines innovation across America during the late 19th and early 20th century helps fill in this gap.

The authors examine innovation and inventors in the U.S. during this period using U.S. patent data and census data from 1880 to 1940. The figure below shows the geographic distribution of inventiveness in 1940. Darker colors mean higher rates of inventive activity.

geography of inventiveness 1940

Most of the inventive activity in 1940 was in the industrial Midwest and Northeast, with California being the most notable western exception.

The next figure depicts the relationship between the log of the total number of patents granted to inventors in each state from 1900 to 2000 (x-axis) and annualized GDP growth (y-axis) over the same period for the 48 contiguous states.

innovation, long run growth US states

As shown there is a strong positive relationship between this measure of innovation and economic growth. The authors also conduct multi-variable regression analyses, including an instrumental variable analysis, and find the same positive relationship.

The better understand why certain states had more inventive activity than others in the early 20th century, the authors analyze several factors: 1) urbanization, 2) access to capital, 3) geographic connectedness and 4) openness to new ideas.

The figures below show the more urbanization was associated with more innovation from 1940 to 1960. The left figure plots the percent of people in each state living in an urban area in 1940 on the x-axis while the right has the percent living on a farm on the x-axis. Both figures tell the same story—rural states were less innovative.

pop density, innovation 1940-1960

Next, the authors look at the financial health of each state using deposits per capita as their measure. A stable, well-funded banking system makes it easier for inventors to get the capital they need to innovate. The figure below shows the positive relationship between deposits per capita in 1920 and patent production from 1920 to 1930.

innovation, bank deposits 1920-1940

The size of the market should also matter to inventors, since greater access to consumers means more sales and profits from successful inventions. The figures below show the relationship between a state’s transport cost advantage (x-axis) and innovation. The left figure depicts all of the states while the right omits the less populated, more geographically isolated Western states.

innovation, transport costs 1920-1940

States with a greater transport cost advantage in 1920—i.e. less economically isolated—were more innovative from 1920 to 1940, and this relationship is stronger when states in the far West are removed.

The last relationship the authors examine is that between innovation and openness to new, potentially disruptive ideas. One of their proxies for openness is the percent of families who owned slaves in a state, with more slave ownership being a sign of less openness to change and innovation.

innovation, slavery 1880-1940

The figures show that more slave ownership in 1860 was associated with less innovation at the state-level from 1880 to 1940. This negative relationship holds when all states are included (left figure) and when states with no slave ownership in 1860—which includes many Northern states—are omitted (right figure).

The authors also analyze individual-level data and find that inventors of the early 20th century were more likely to migrate across state lines than the rest of the population. Additionally, they find that conditional on moving, inventors tended to migrate to states that were more urbanized, had higher bank deposits per capita and had lower rates of historical slave ownership.

Next, the relationship between innovation and inequality is examined. Inequality has been a hot topic the last several years, with many people citing research by economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez that argues that inequality has increased in the U.S. since the 1970s. The methods and data used to construct some of the most notable evidence of increasing inequality has been criticized, but this has not made the topic any less popular.

In theory, innovation has an ambiguous effect on inequality. If there is a lot of regulation and high barriers to entry, the profits from innovation may primarily accrue to large established companies, which would tend to increase inequality.

On the other hand, new firms that create innovative new products can erode the market share and profits of larger, richer firms, and this would tend to decrease inequality. This idea of innovation aligns with economist Joseph Schumpeter’s “creative destruction”.

So what was going on in the early 20th century? The figure below shows the relationship between innovation and two measures of state-level inequality: the ratio of the 90th percentile wage over the 10th percentile wage in 1940 and the wage income Gini coefficient in 1940. For each measure, a smaller value means less inequality.

innovation, inc inequality 1920-1940

As shown in the figures above, a higher patent rate is correlated with less inequality. However, only the result using 90-10 ratio remains statistically significant when each state’s occupation mix is controlled for in a multi-variable regression.

The authors also find that when the share of income controlled by the top 1% of earners is used as the measure of inequality, the relationship between innovation and inequality makes a U shape. That is, innovation decreases inequality up to a point, but after that point it’s associated with more inequality.

Thus when using the broader measures of inequality (90-10 ratio, Gini coeffecieint) innovation is negatively correlated with inequality, but when using a measure of top-end inequality (income controlled by top 1%) the relationship is less clear. This shows that inequality results are sensitive to the measurement of inequality used.

Social mobility is an important measure of economic opportunity within a society and the figure below shows that innovation is positively correlated with greater social mobility.

innovation, social mobility 1940

The measure of social mobility used is the percentage of people who have a high-skill occupation in 1940 given that they had a low-skill father (y-axis). States with more innovation from 1920 to 1940 had more social mobility according to this measure.

In the early 20th century it appears that innovation improved social mobility and decreased inequality, though the latter result is sensitive to the measurement of inequality. However, the two concepts are not equally important: Economic and social mobility are worthy societal ideals that require opportunity to be available to all, while static income or wealth inequality is largely a red herring that distracts us from more important issues. And once you take into account the consumer-benefits of innovation during this period—electricity, the automobile, refrigeration etc.—it is clear that innovation does far more good than harm.

This paper is interesting and useful for several reasons. First, it shows that innovation is important for economic growth over a long time period for one country. It also shows that more innovation occurred in denser, urbanized states that provided better access to capital, were more interconnected and were more open to new, disruptive ideas. These results are consistent with what economists have found using more recent data, but this research provides evidence that these relationships have existed over a much longer time period.

The positive relationships between innovation and income equality/social mobility in the early 20th century should also help alleviate the fears some people have about the negative effects of creative destruction. Innovation inevitably creates adjustment costs that harm some people, but during this period it doesn’t appear that it caused widespread harm to workers.

If we reduce regulation today in order to encourage more innovation and competition we will likely experience similar results, along with more economic growth and all of the consumer benefits.

Why Do We Get So Much Regulation?

Over the past 60 or 70 years, levels of regulation in the United States have been on the rise by almost any measure. As evidence, in the year 1950 there were only 9,745 pages in the US Code of Federal Regulations. Today that number is over 178,000 pages. There is less information about regulation at the state level, but anecdotal evidence suggests regulation is on the rise there too. For example, the Commonwealth of Kentucky publishes its regulatory code each year in a series of volumes known as the Kentucky Administrative Regulations Service (KARS). These volumes consist of books, each roughly 400 or 500 pages or so in length. In 1975, there were 4 books in the KARS. By 2015, that number had risen to 14 books. There are many different theories as to why so much regulation gets produced, so it makes sense to review some of those theories in order to explain the phenomenon of regulatory accumulation.

Perhaps the most popular theory of regulation is that it exists to advance the public interest. According to this view, well-intended regulators intervene in the marketplace due to “market failures”, which are situations where the market fails to allocate resources optimally. Some common examples of market failures include externalities (cases where third parties are impacted by the transactions involving others), asymmetric information (cases where buyers and sellers possess different levels of information about products being sold), public goods problems (whereby certain items are under-provided or not provided at all by the market), and concentration of industry in the form of monopoly power. When market failure occurs, the idea is that regulators intervene in order to make imperfect markets behave more like theoretically perfect markets.

Other theories of regulation are less optimistic about the motivations of the different participants in the rulemaking process. One popular theory suggests regulators work primarily to help powerful special interest groups, a phenomenon known as regulatory capture. Under this view—commonly associated with the writings of University of Chicago economist George Stigler—regulators fix prices and limit entry into an industry because it benefits the industry being regulated. An example would be how regulators, up until the late 1970s, fixed airline prices above what they would have been in a competitive market.

The interest groups that “capture” regulatory agencies are most often thought to be businesses, but it’s important to remember that agencies can also be captured by other groups. The revolving door between the government and the private sector doesn’t end with large banks. It also extends to nonprofit groups, labor unions, and activist groups of various kinds that also wield significant resources and power.

The “public choice theory” of regulation posits that public officials are primarily self-interested, rather than being focused on advancing the public interest. Under this view, regulators may be most concerned with increasing their own salaries or budgets. Or, they may be focused primarily on concentrating their own power.

It’s also possible that regulators are not nearly so calculating and rational as this. The behavioral public choice theory of regulation suggests regulators behave irrationally in many cases, due to the cognitive limitations inherent in all human beings. A case in point is how regulatory agencies routinely overestimate risks, or try to regulate already very low risks down to zero. There is significant evidence that people, including regulators, tend to overestimate small probability risks, leading to responses that are disproportionate to the expected harm. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency’s evaluations of sites related to the Superfund clean-up project routinely overestimated risks by orders of magnitude. Such overreactions might also be a response to public perceptions, for example in response to high-profile media events, such as following acts of terrorism. If the public’s reactions carry over into the voting booth, then legislation and regulation may be enacted soon after.

One of the more interesting and novel theories as to why we see regulation relates to public trust in institutions. A 2010 paper in the Quarterly Journal of Economics noted that there is a strong correlation between trust in various social institutions and some measures of regulation. The figure below is an example of this relationship, found in the paper.

QJE trust

Trust can relate to public institutions, such as the government, but it also extends to trust in corporations and in our fellow citizens. Interestingly, the authors of the QJE article argue that an environment of low trust and high regulation can be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Low levels of trust, ironically, can lead to more demand for regulation, even when there is little trust in the government. One reason for this might be that people think that giving an untrustworthy government control over private affairs is still superior to allowing unscrupulous businesses to have free rein.

The flip-side of this situation is that in high-trust countries, such as Sweden, the public demands lower levels of regulation and this can breed more trust. So an environment of free-market policies combined with trustworthy businesses can produce good market outcomes, more trust, and this too can be a self-fulfilling, allowing some countries to maintain a “good” equilibrium.

This is concerning for the United States because trust has been on the decline in a whole host of areas. A Gallop survey has been asking questions related to trust in public institutions for several decades. There is a long-term secular decline in Gallup’s broad measure of trust, as evidenced by the figure below, although periodically there are upswings in the measure.

gallup trust

Pew has a similar survey that looks at public trust in the government. Here the decline is even more evident.

pew trust

Given that regulation has been on the rise for decades, a decline in trust in the government, in corporations, and in each other, may be a key reason this is occurring. Of course, it’s possible that these groups are simply dishonest and do not merit public trust. Nonetheless, the US might find itself stuck in a self-fulfilling situation, whereby distrust breeds more government intervention in the economy, worse market outcomes, and even more distrust in the future. Getting out of that kind of situation is not easy. One way might be through education about the institutions that lead to free and prosperous societies, as well as to create a culture whereby corruption and unscrupulous behavior are discouraged.

There are a number of theories that seek to explain why regulation comes about. No theory is perfect, and some theories explain certain situations better than others. Nonetheless, the theories presented here go a long way towards laying out the forces that lead to regulation, even if no one theory can explain all regulation at all times.

Why the lack of labor mobility in the U.S. is a problem and how we can fix it

Many researchers have found evidence that mobility in the U.S. is declining. More specifically, it doesn’t appear that people move from places with weaker economies to places with stronger economies as consistently as they did in the past. Two sets of figures from a paper by Peter Ganong and Daniel Shoag succinctly show this decline over time.

The first, shown below, has log income per capita by state on the x-axis for two different years, 1940 (left) and 1990 (right). On the vertical axis of each graph is the annual population growth rate by state for two periods, 1940 – 1960 (left) and 1990 – 2010 (right).

directed migration ganong, shoag

In the 1940 – 1960 period, the graph depicts a strong positive relationship: States with higher per capita incomes in 1940 experienced more population growth over the next 20 years than states with lower per capita incomes. This relationship disappears and actually reverses in the 1990 – 2010 period: States with higher per capita incomes actually grew slower on average. So in general people became less likely to move to states with higher incomes between the middle and end of the 20th century. Other researchers have also found that people are not moving to areas with better economies.

This had an effect on income convergence, as shown in the next set of figures. In the 1940 – 1960 period (left), states with higher per capita incomes experienced less income growth than states with lower per capita incomes, as shown by the negative relationship. This negative relationship existed in the 1990 – 2010 period as well, but it was much weaker.

income convergence ganong, shoag

We would expect income convergence when workers leave low income states for high income states, since that increases the labor supply in high-income states and pushes down wages. Meanwhile, the labor supply decreases in low-income states which increases wages. Overall, this leads to per capita incomes converging across states.

Why labor mobility matters

As law professor David Schleicher points out in a recent paper, the current lack of labor mobility can reduce the ability of the federal government to manage the U.S. economy. In the U.S. we have a common currency—every state uses the U.S. dollar. This means that if a state is hit by an economic shock, e.g. low energy prices harm Texas, Alaska and North Dakota but help other states, that state’s currency cannot adjust to cushion the blow.

For example, if the UK goes into a recession, the Bank of England can print more money so that the pound will depreciate relative to other currencies, making goods produced in the UK relatively cheap. This will decrease the UK’s imports and increase economic activity and exports, which will help it emerge from the recession. If the U.S. as a whole suffered a negative economic shock, a similar process would take place.

However, within a country this adjustment mechanism is unavailable: Texas can’t devalue its dollar relative to Ohio’s dollar. There is no within-country monetary policy that can help particular states or regions. Instead, the movement of capital and labor from weak areas to strong areas is the primary mechanism available for restoring full employment within the U.S. If capital and labor mobility are low it will take longer for the U.S. to recover from area-specific negative economic shocks.

State or area-specific economic shocks are more likely in large countries like the U.S. that have very diverse local economies. This makes labor and capital mobility more important in the U.S. than in smaller, less economically diverse countries such as Denmark or Switzerland, since those countries are less susceptible to area-specific economic shocks.

Why labor mobility is low

There is some consensus about policies that can increase labor mobility. Many people, including former President Barack Obama, my colleagues at the Mercatus Center and others, have pointed out that state occupational licensing makes it harder for workers in licensed professions to move across state borders. There is similar agreement that land-use regulations increase housing prices which makes it harder for people to move to areas with the strongest economies.

Reducing occupational licensing and land-use regulations would increase labor mobility, but actually doing these things is not easy. Occupational licensing and land-use regulations are controlled at the state and local level, so currently there is little that the federal government can do.

Moreover, as Mr. Schleicher points out in his paper, state and local governments created these regulations for a reason and it’s not clear that they have any incentive to change them. Like all politicians, state and local ones care about being re-elected and that means, at least to some extent, listening to their constituents. These residents usually value stability, so politicians who advocate too strongly for growth may find themselves out of office. Mr. Schleicher also notes that incumbent politicians often prefer a stable, immobile electorate because it means that the voters who elected them in the first place will be there next election cycle.

Occupational licensing and land-use regulations make it harder for people to enter thriving local economies, but other policies make it harder to leave areas with poor economies. Nearly 13% of Americans work for state and local governments and 92% of them have a defined-benefit pension plan. Defined-benefit plans have long vesting periods and benefits can be significantly smaller if employees split their career between multiple employers rather than remain at one employer. Thus over 10% of the workforce has a strong retirement-based incentive to stay where they are.

Eligibility standards for public benefits and their amounts also vary by state, and this discourages people who receive benefits such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) from moving to states that may have a stronger economy but less benefits. Even when eligibility standards and benefits are similar, the paperwork and time burden of enrolling in a new state can discourage mobility.

The federal government subsidizes home ownership as well, and homeownership is correlated with less labor mobility over time. Place-based subsidies to declining cities also artificially support areas that should have less people. As long as state and federal governments subsidize government services in cities like Atlantic City and Detroit people will be less inclined to leave them. People-based subsidies that incentivize people to move to thriving areas are an alternative that is likely better for the taxpayer, the recipient and the country in the long run.

How to increase labor mobility

Since state and local governments are unlikely to directly address the impediments to labor mobility that they have created, Mr. Schleicher argues for more federal involvement. Some of his suggestions don’t interfere with local control, such as a federal clearinghouse for coordinated occupational-licensing rules across states. This is not a bad idea but I am not sure how effective it would be.

Other suggestions are more intrusive and range from complete federal preemption of state and local rules to federal grants that encourage more housing construction or suspension of the mortgage-interest deduction in places that restrict housing construction.

Local control is important due to the presence of local knowledge and the beneficial effects that arise from interjurisdictional competition, so I don’t support complete federal preemption of local rules. Economist William Fischel also thinks the mortgage interest deduction is largely responsible for excessive local land-use regulation, so eliminating it altogether or suspending it in places that don’t allow enough new housing seems like a good idea.

I also support more people-based subsidies that incentivize moving to areas with better economies and less place-based subsidies. These subsidies could target people living in specific places and the amounts could be based on the economic characteristics of the destination, with larger amounts given to people who are willing to move to areas with the most employment opportunities and/or highest wages.

Making it easier for people to retain any state-based government benefits across state lines would also help improve labor mobility. I support reforms that reduce the paperwork and time requirements for transferring benefits or for simply understanding what steps need to be taken to do so.

Several policy changes will need to occur before we can expect to see significant changes in labor mobility. There is broad agreement around some of them, such as occupational licensing and land-use regulation reform, but bringing them to fruition will take time. As for the less popular ideas, it will be interesting to see which, if any, are tried.

Today’s public policies exacerbate our differences

The evidence that land-use regulations harm potential migrants keeps piling up. A recent paper in the Journal of Urban Economics finds that young workers (age 22 – 26) of average ability who enter the labor force in a large city (metropolitan areas with a population > 1.5 million) earn a wage premium equal 22.9% after 5 years.

The author also finds that high-ability workers experience additional wage growth in large cities but not in small cities or rural areas. This leads to high-ability workers sorting themselves into large cities and contributes an additional 3.2% to the urban wage-growth premium.

These findings are consistent with several other papers that have analyzed the urban wage premium. Potential causes of the wage premium are faster human capital accumulation in denser, more populated places due to knowledge spillovers and more efficient labor markets that better match employers and employees.

The high cost of housing in San Francisco, D.C., New York and dozens of other cities is preventing many young people from earning more money and improving their lives. City officials and residents need to strike a better balance between maintaining the “charm” of their neighborhoods and affordability. This means less regulation and more building.

City vs. rural is only one of the many dichotomies pundits have been discussing since the 2016 election. Some of the other versions of “two Americas” are educated vs. non-educated, white collar vs. blue collar, and rich vs. poor. We can debate how much these differences matter, but to the extent that they are an issue for the country our public policies have reinforced the barriers that allow them to persist.

Occupational licensing makes it more difficult for blue-collar manufacturing workers to transition to middle-class service sector jobs. Federal loan subsidies have made four-year colleges artificially cheap to the detriment of people with only a high school education. Restrictive zoning has made it too expensive for many people to move to places with the best labor markets. And once you’re in a city, unless you’re in one of the best neighborhoods your fellow citizens often keep employers and providers of much needed consumer staples like Wal-Mart out, while using eminent domain to build their next playground.

Over time people have sorted themselves into different groups and then erected barriers to keep others out. Communities do it with land-use regulations, occupations do it with licensing and established firms do it with regulatory capture. If we want a more prosperous America that de-emphasizes our differences and provides people of all backgrounds with opportunity we need more “live and let live” and less “my way or the highway”.

More labor market freedom means more labor force participation

The U.S. labor force participation (LFP) rate has yet to bounce back to its pre-recession level. Some of the decline is due to retiring baby-boomers but even the prime-age LFP rate, which only counts people age 25 – 54 and thus less affected by retirement, has not recovered.

Economists and government officials are concerned about the weak recovery in labor force participation. A high LFP rate is usually a sign of a strong economy—people are either working or optimistic about their chances of finding a job. A low LFP rate is often a sign of little economic opportunity or disappointment with the employment options available.

The U.S. is a large, diverse country so the national LFP rate obscures substantial state variation in LFP rates. The figure below shows the age 16 and up LFP rates for the 50 states and the U.S. as a whole (black bar) in 2014. (data)

2014-state-lfp-rates

The rates range from a high of 72.6% in North Dakota to a low of 53.1% in West Virginia. The U.S. rate was 62.9%. Several of the states with relatively low rates are in the south, including Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas. Florida and Arizona also had relatively low labor force participation, which is not surprising considering their reputations as retirement destinations.

There are several reasons why some states have more labor force participation than others. Demographics is one: states with a higher percentage of people over age 65 and between 16 and 22 will have lower rates on average since people in these age groups are often retired or in school full time. States also have different economies made up of different industries and at any given time some industries are thriving while others are struggling.

Federal and state regulation also play a role. Federal regulation disparately impacts different states because of the different industrial compositions of state economies. For example, states with large energy industries tend to be more affected by federal regulation than other states.

States also tax and regulate their labor markets differently. States have different occupational licensing standards, different minimum wages and different levels of payroll and income taxes among other things. Each of these things alters the incentive for businesses to hire or for people to join the labor market and thus affects states’ LFP rates.

We can see the relationship between labor market freedom and labor force participation in the figure below. The figure shows the relationship between the Economic Freedom of North America’s 2013 labor market freedom score (x-axis) and the 2014 labor force participation rate for each state (y-axis).

lab-mkt-freed-and-lfp-rate

As shown in the figure there is a positive relationship—more labor market freedom is associated with a higher LFP rate on average. States with lower freedom scores such as Mississippi, Kentucky and Alabama also had low LFP rates while states with higher freedom scores such as North Dakota, South Dakota and Virginia had higher LFP rates.

This is not an all-else-equal analysis and other variables—such as demographics and industry composition which I mentioned earlier—also play a role. That being said, state officials concerned about their state’s labor market should think about what they can do to increase labor market freedom—and economic freedom more broadly—in their state.

More competition can lead to less inequality

Wealth inequality in the United States and many European countries, especially between the richest and the rest, has been a popular topic since Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century was published. Piketty and others argue that tax data shows that wealth inequality has increased in the U.S. since the late 1970s, as seen in the figure below from a paper by Emmanuel Saez—Picketty’s frequent co-author— and Gabriel Zucman.

top-0-1-income-inequ

The figure shows the percentage of all U.S. household wealth that is owned by the top 0.1% of households, which as the note explains consists of about 160,000 families. The percentage fell from 25% in the late 1920s to about 7% in the late 1970s and then began to rise. Many people have used this and similar data to argue for higher marginal taxes on the rich and more income redistribution in order to close the wealth gap between the richest and the rest.

While politicians and pundits continue debating what should be done, if anything, about taxes and redistribution, many economists are trying to understand what factors can affect wealth and thus the wealth distribution over time. An important one that is not talked about enough is competition, specifically Joseph Schumpeter’s idea of creative destruction.

Charles Jones, a professor at Stanford, has discussed the connection between profits and creative destruction and their link with inequality. To help illustrate the connection, Mr. Jones uses the example of an entrepreneur who creates a new phone app. The app’s creator will earn profits over time as the app’s popularity and sales increase. However, her profits will eventually decline due to the process of creative destruction: a newer, better app will hit the market that pulls her customers away from her product, erodes her sales and forces her to adapt or fail. The longer she is able to differentiate her product from others, the longer she will be in business and the more money she will earn. This process is stylized in the figure below.

firm-life-and-profit2

If the app maintains its popularity for the duration of firm life 1, the entrepreneur will earn profits P1. After that the firm is replaced by a new firm that also exists for firm life 1 and earns profit P1. The longer a firm is able to maintain its product’s uniqueness, the more profit it will earn, as shown by firm life 2: In this case the firm earns profit P2. A lack of competition stretches out a firm’s life cycle since the paucity of substitutes makes it costlier for consumers to switch products if the value of the firm’s product declines.

Higher profits can translate into greater inequality as well, especially if we broaden the discussion to include wages and sole-proprietor income. Maintaining market power for a long period of time by restricting entry not only increases corporate profits, it also allows doctors, lawyers, opticians, and a host of other workers who operate under a licensing regime that restricts entry to earn higher wages than they otherwise would. The higher wages obtained due to state restrictions on healthcare provision, restrictions on providing legal services and state-level occupational licensing can exacerbate inequality at the lower levels of the income distribution as well as the higher levels.

Workers and sole proprietors in the U.S. have been using government to restrict entry into occupations since the country was founded. In the past such restrictions were often drawn on racial or ethnic lines. In their Pulitzer Prize-winning history of New York City, Gotham, historians Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace write about New York City cartmen in the 1820s:

American-born carters complained to the city fathers that Irish immigrants, who had been licensed during the war [of 1812] while Anglo-Dutchmen were off soldiering, were undercutting established rates and stealing customers. Mayor Colden limited future alien licensing to dirt carting, a field the Irish quickly dominated. When they continued to challenge the Anglo-Americans in other areas, the Society of Cartmen petitioned the Common Council to reaffirm their “ancient privileges”. The municipal government agreed, rejecting calls for the decontrol of carting, as the business and trade of the city depended on in it, and in 1826 the council banned aliens from carting, pawnbroking, and hackney-coach driving; soon all licensed trades were closed to them.

Modern occupational licensing is the legacy of these earlier, successful efforts to protect profits by limiting entry, often of “undesirables”. Today’s occupational licensing is no longer a response to racial or ethnic prejudices, but it has similar results: It protects the earning power of established providers.

Throughout America’s history the economy has been relatively dynamic, and this dynamism has made it difficult for businesses to earn profits for long periods of time; only 12% of the companies on the Fortune 500 in 1955 were still on the list in 2015. In a properly functioning capitalist economy, newer, poorer firms will regularly supplant older, richer firms and this economic churn tempers inequality.

The same churn occurs among the highest echelon of individuals as well. An increasing number of the Forbes 400 are self-made, often from humble beginnings. In 1984, 99 people on the list inherited their fortune and were not actively growing it. By 2014 only 28 people were in the same position. Meanwhile, the percentage of the Forbes 400 who are largely self-made increased from 43% to 69% over the same period.

But this dynamism may be abating and excessive regulation is likely a factor. For example, the rate of new-bank formation from 1990 – 2010 was about 100 banks per year. Since 2010, the rate has fallen to about three per year. Researchers have attributed some of the decline of small banks to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, which increased compliance costs that disproportionately harm small banks. Fewer banks means less competition and higher prices.

Another recent example of how a lack of competition can increase profits and inequality is EpiPen. The price of EpiPen—a medicine used to treat severe allergic reactions to things like peanuts—has increased dramatically since 2011. This price increase was possible because there are almost no good substitutes for EpiPen, and the lack of substitutes can be attributed to the FDA and other government policies that have insulated EpiPen’s maker, Mylan, from market competition. Meanwhile, the compensation of Mylan’s CEO Heather Bresch increased by 671% from 2007 to 2015. I doubt that Bresch’s compensation would have increased by such a large amount without the profits of EpiPen.

Letting firms and workers compete in the marketplace fosters economic growth and can help dampen inequality. To the extent that wealth inequality is an issue we don’t need more regulation and redistribution to fix it: We need more competition.

Thinking like an Economist Means Thinking about Tradeoffs

This week, I’ve written two articles about different types of tradeoffs that economists think about when they evaluate the likely effectiveness of proposed public policies. One type of tradeoff relates to the costs that consumers and businesses incur in exchange for the benefits policies will achieve, while a second type of tradeoff involves countervailing risks that sometimes increase as policies aim to reduce other risks.

An example of the first type of tradeoff, involving benefits and costs, comes from energy efficiency regulations for appliances. These regulations do produce some benefits involving reduced emissions, but entire classes of very important costs are routinely overlooked by regulatory agencies. When an agency doesn’t count what consumers give up in exchange for the good things policies produce, there is a greater chance people will be made worse off by a policy. That’s bad news.

Here is a relevant portion of an op-ed I wrote published in the Washington Times:

The Department of Energy sets energy conservation standards that limit the amount of electricity that can be used by home appliances like refrigerators and air conditioners. These sweeping regulations affect nearly every American consumer. The department claims its rules address an imminent problem — environmental degradation — and argues that its conservation rules produce two main benefits: First, more energy-efficient appliances use less energy, so we all release fewer emissions into the atmosphere. Second, by using less energy, consumers may save money over time on monthly utility bills.

Sounds like a win-win situation, right? Not so fast.

We haven’t considered the costs of these regulations. Consumers care about their utility bills and the environment, but they also care about how well a product works, its appearance, whether the product comes with or without a warranty, the purchase price, and countless other things. When product attributes change as a result of regulations, these are costs to consumers. But the costs are ignored by regulators at the Energy Department. Regulators do consider some costs, like how much more appliance makers will have to pay when they are forced to comply with new rules, but the costs to consumers — whom we should care most about — are systematically overlooked.

In a second article, published in US News and World Report, I show how tradeoffs can involve more than just benefits and costs (which are valued in monetary terms). Tradeoffs can also involve risks. An example of a risk tradeoff comes from proposed legislation in New Jersey that targets distracted driving. The bill would ban drivers from engaging in “any” activity unrelated to driving that might interfere with the safe operation of a vehicle in the state. Some have said the bill’s language is so expansive that drinking a cup of coffee while driving would be banned.

The distracted driving bill has the potential to create what economists call “risk tradeoffs,” which occur when the mitigation of one risk simultaneously increases the risk of another. This bill addresses an all-too-real danger, but any law that prevents people from drinking coffee behind the wheel is going to increase at least one other risk: the risk created by drowsy drivers on the roads.

With fewer people drinking coffee on the roads, that means more sleepy truck drivers hauling sixteen wheelers at 2am. Is that a risk worth bearing in exchange for fewer distracted drivers? That’s a difficult question that will involve careful analysis to answer.

Risk tradeoffs are actually pretty ubiquitous, and involve far more than just Jersey drivers.

One of the most common ways new policies create risk tradeoffs is through “substitution effects.” For example, when a pesticide is banned, farmers usually switch to a different pesticide instead. The new chemical may be safer than the banned one, but it could also be more dangerous. Sometimes risks are simply shifted from one group of people to another. A new pesticide might reduce the risk from eating residue left on fruit in the supermarket, but at the same time, it could create new risks for farmers who work among the sprayed fruit.

Considering these kinds of tradeoffs—benefit/cost and risk/risk—is what rational decision making is all about. Any good economists is trained to think about these things when evaluating proposed policies. If legislators and regulators are going to use the resources we entrust them with wisely, we should all demand they think like economists too.

Washington’s Legitimacy Crisis Presents an Opportunity for the States

You’ve heard it before. Americans are deeply unhappy with Washington, DC. Sixty-five percent say the country is on the wrong track. Confidence in institutions is near all-time lows. Congress’s approval rating is terrible, and the two major presidential candidates are viewed more negatively than any other mainstream presidential candidates in recent memory. Only nineteen percent of the public trust the government to do the right thing all or most of the time.

Washington’s dysfunction—what is probably driving these perceptions—extends to all three branches of the federal government. Congress is in a near-permanent state of gridlock. The president uses his executive authority wherever possible, but often with little practical impact. Even regulatory agencies are facing what Brookings Institution scholar Philip Wallach has dubbed a legitimacy crisis of the administrative state, as the public grows more skeptical of leaving the most important policymaking decisions to insulated and unelected regulators.

The courts are in little better shape. Since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court has been hobbled without its ninth member. Even before this development, there was a perception building that politics too often enters the Court’s decisions, no doubt contributing to the gradual increase in the Supreme Court’s disapproval rating over time.

On a brighter note, in contrast to this crisis of legitimacy at the federal level, polling data suggests that Americans still generally trust their state and local governments. The cop on the beat, the garbage man, and the postal worker, are still trusted symbols of everyday American life.  Furthermore, the social divisions that make dramatic change at the federal level difficult (i.e. red state versus blue state stuff) actually make it easier to get things done in the states.

Where governorships and state legislatures are dominated by a single party, there are opportunities to advance creative policy solutions, allowing the states to fulfill their roles as laboratories of democracy. Policy reforms in the states, where successful, can lay the groundwork for future changes at the federal level, perhaps restoring badly-needed trust in our ailing institutions.

There are a many reasons to be cynical about where the country is headed, and to doubt whether our leaders are capable of addressing our looming challenges. However, the states should not be made complacent by this state of affairs. They should view Washington’s dysfunction as an opportunity and not a reason for despair. Now is an opportune moment to step up and demonstrate what it means to govern. Perhaps…just perhaps… our friends in Washington might pay attention and learn something.

Northern Cities Need To Be Bold If They Want To Grow

Geography and climate have played a significant role in U.S. population growth since 1970 (see here, here, here, and here). The figure below shows the correlation between county-level natural amenities and county population growth from 1970 – 2013 controlling for other factors including the population of the county in 1970, the average wage of the county in 1970 (a measure of labor productivity), the proportion of adults in the county with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 1970 and region of the country. The county-level natural amenities index is from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and scores the counties in the continental U.S. according to their climate and geographic features. The county with the worst score is Red Lake, MN and the county with the best score is Ventura, CA.

1970-13 pop growth, amenities

As shown in the figure the slope of the best fit line is positive. The coefficient from the regression is also given at the bottom of the figure and is equal to 0.16, meaning a one point increase in the score increased population growth by 16 percentage points on average.

The effect of natural amenities on population growth is much larger than the effect of the proportion of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher, which is another strong predictor of population growth at the metropolitan (MSA) and city level (see here, here, here, and here). The relationship between county population growth from 1970 – 2013 and human capital is depicted below.

1970-13 pop growth, bachelors or more

Again, the relationship is positive but the effect is smaller. The coefficient is 0.026 which means a 1 percentage point increase in the proportion of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 1970 increased population growth by 2.6 percentage points on average.

An example using some specific counties can help us see the difference between the climate and education effects. In the table below the county where I grew up, Greene County, OH, is the baseline county. I also include five other urban counties from around the country: Charleston County, SC; Dallas County, TX; Eau Claire County, WI; San Diego County, CA; and Sedgwick County, TX.

1970-13 pop chg, amenities table

The first column lists the amenities score for each county. The highest score belongs to San Diego. The second column lists the difference between Green County’s score and the other counties, e.g. 9.78 – (-1.97) = 11.75 which is the difference between Greene County’s score and San Diego’s score. The third column is the difference column multiplied by the 0.16 coefficient from the natural amenity figure e.g. 11.75 x 0.16 = 188% in the San Diego row. What this means is that according to this model, if Greene County had San Diego’s climate and geography it would have grown by an additional 188 percentage points from 1970 – 2013 all else equal.

Finally, the last column is the actual population growth of the county from 1970 – 2013. As shown, San Diego County grew by 135% while Greene County only grew by 30% over this 43 year period. Improving Greene County’s climate to that of any of the other counties except for Eau Claire would have increased its population growth by a substantial yet realistic amount.

Table 2 below is similar to the natural amenities table above only it shows the different effects on Greene County’s population growth due to a change in the proportion of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

1970-13 pop chg, bachelor's table

As shown in the first column, Greene County actually had the largest proportion of adults with bachelor’s degree or higher in 1970 – 14.7% – of the counties listed.

The third column shows how Greene County’s population growth would have changed if it had the same proportion of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher as the other counties did in 1970. If Greene County had the proportion of Charleston (11.2%) instead of 14.7% in 1970, its population growth is predicted to have been 9 percentage points lower from 1970 – 2013, all else equal. All of the effects in the table are negative since all of the counties had a lower proportion than Greene and population education has a positive effect on population growth.

Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of an educated population on overall city population growth – often through its impact on entrepreneurial activity – but as shown here the education effect tends to be swamped by geographic and climate features. What this means is that city officials in less desirable areas need to be bold in order to compensate for the poor geography and climate that are out of their control.

A highly educated population combined with a business environment that fosters innovation can create the conditions for city growth. Burdensome land-use regulations, lengthy, confusing permitting processes, and unpredictable rules coupled with inconsistent enforcement increase the costs of doing business and stifle entrepreneurship. When these harmful business-climate factors are coupled with a generally bad climate the result is something like Cleveland, OH.

The reality is that the tax and regulatory environments of declining manufacturing cities remain too similar to those of cities in the Sunbelt while their weather and geography differ dramatically, and not in a good way. Since only relative differences cause people and firms to relocate, the similarity across tax and regulatory environments ensures that weather and climate remain the primary drivers of population change.

To overcome the persistent disadvantage of geography and climate officials in cold-weather cities need to be aggressive in implementing reforms. Fiddling around the edges of tax and regulatory policy in a half-hearted attempt to attract educated people, entrepreneurs and large, high-skill employers is a waste of time and residents’ resources – Florida’s cities have nicer weather and they’re in a state with no income tax. Northern cities like Flint, Cleveland, and Milwaukee that simply match the tax and regulatory environment of Houston, San Diego, or Tampa have done nothing to differentiate themselves along those dimensions and still have far worse weather.

Location choices reveal that people are willing to put up with a lot of negatives to live in places with good weather. California has one of the worst tax and regulatory environments of any state in the country and terrible congestion problems yet its large cities continue to grow. A marginally better business environment is not going to overcome the allure of the sun and beaches.

While a better business environment that is attractive to high-skilled workers and encourages entrepreneurship is unlikely to completely close the gap between a place like San Diego and Dayton when it comes to being a nice place to live and work, it’s a start. And more importantly it’s the only option cities like Dayton, Buffalo, Cleveland, St. Louis and Detroit have.