Tag Archives: AA

Fitch Downgrades Cook County’s Bond Rating Because of Pension Liabilities

Fitch Ratings downgraded the general obligation bond rating of Cook County, Illinois, from AA to AA- earlier this week. Moody’s similar downgrade last June makes this Cook County’s second downgrade of the year.

It is of no surprise that the county’s pension liabilities were cited as an important factor in the downgrade. Cook County’s local governments currently face more than $108 billion in outstanding debt, almost a quarter of which can be attributed to unfunded pension liabilities.

This problem is further compounded by the fact that the City of Chicago has its own unfunded pension liability of $48.8 billion or $42,000 per capita.

Illinois’s pension problems, however, run much deeper than Cook County. Illinois’s FY 2012 operating budget reports that the state’s pension system is 45 percent funded with total unfunded liabilities amounting to $75.7 billion.

Although, in recent research, Eileen Norcross and I find that when using discount rates that reflect the risk of public pension liabilities, Illinois’s unfunded pension liabilities amount to $173 billion and the funded ratio across systems drops to 36 percent in FY 2010.

By 2018, Illinois pension system will require a tripling of the state’s annual contributions from $6 billion to $17.5 billion. Therefore, without serious structural reform, it is likely that Illinois’s pension liabilities will lead to additional rating downgrades in the future.

 

How a US downgrade affects the states

Last night’s news of a downgrade of long-term US debt from AAA to AA+ by S&P will have a ripple effect. But whether or not interest rates rise depends on how the market incorporates this information and whether it has anticipated this.

As far as states go, in July, Moody’s put five states on a downgrade watch list: Tennessee, South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and New Mexico. And they gave six reasons: 1) employment volatility; 2) high federal employment relative to total state employment, 3)  federal procurement contracts as a percent of state GDP, 4) Size of Medicaid expenditures relative to state spending, 5) variable interest rate debt as a percent of state resources and 6) the size of the operating fund balance as a percent of operating revenues.

On August 4th these states were removed from the list and retain their AAa rating.

Places with a lot of exposure to risk, or a “high dependence on federal economic activity,”  include Virginia and Massachusetts. This doesn’t mean that these states and their local governments will see their interest rates rise, or be downgraded, or that they are in any danger of default.  It simply means their books will be scrutinized with this risk exposure in mind.