Tag Archives: American Community Survey

Baltimore’s misguided move to raise its minimum wage will harm its most vulnerable

Baltimore’s city council, like others around the country, is considering raising the city’s minimum wage to $15 per hour. This is an ill-advised move that will make it harder for young people and the least skilled to find employment, which is already a difficult task in Baltimore.

The figure below shows the age 16 – 19 labor force participation (LFP) rate, employment rate, and unemployment rate in Baltimore City from 2009 to 2014 (most recent data available). The data are from the American Community Survey table S2301.

baltimore 16-19 emp stats

As shown in the figure, the LFP rate declined along with the employment rate, which has caused the unemployment rate to hold steady at approximately 40% (red line). So 40% of Baltimore’s unemployed teens were searching for a job but couldn’t find one and only 20% of all teens were actually employed, a decline of 4 percentage points (blue line). How is increasing the minimum wage to $15 per hour going to help the 40% who are looking for a job find one?

The minimum wage increase may help some people who are able to keep their job at the higher wage, but for the 40% who can’t find a job at the current minimum wage of $8.25, an increase to $15 is only going to make the task harder, if not impossible. Who is standing up for these people?

The data are just as gloomy when looking at workers with less than a high school degree, which is another group that is severely impacted by a higher minimum wage. As the figure below shows, the employment rate is falling while the unemployment rate is rising.

baltimore lt hs emp stats

In 2009 over 42% of people in this skill group were employed (blue line). In 2014 only 37% were, a decline of five percentage points. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate increased from about 19% to over 25% (red line). And all of this occurred while the economy was supposedly improving.

Again we should ask; how is a higher minimum wage going to help the 25% of high school dropouts in Baltimore who are unemployed find a job? It won’t. Unemployed workers do not become more attractive as employees simply because the city council mandates a higher wage.

What’s going to happen is that more people in this skill group will become discouraged and leave the labor market entirely. Then they will earn $0 per hour indefinitely and be forced to rely entirely on family, friends, and public assistance to live. A $15 minimum wage destroys their chances of finding meaningful employment and unduly deprives them of opportunities to better their lives.

This is the unseen effect of minimum wage hikes that $15 supporters rarely acknowledge. When faced with the higher cost, firms will hire workers who can justify a $15 wage and those who cannot will be unable to find employment. Additionally, firms will start using more technology and automation instead of workers. This happens because consumers want low prices and high quality, and as the minimum wage increases technology and capital become the best way to give consumers what they want. Over time workers in states with lower minimum wages may be forced out of the labor market as well as new technologies spread from high minimum wage areas to low minimum wage areas.

Another common argument put forth by minimum wage supporters is that taxpayers subsidize firms that pay low wages. But this is not true. Firms like Wal-Mart, McDonalds, and the countless other large and small business that employ low-skill workers are doing their part by giving people an opportunity. Firm owners did not unilaterally decide that all Americans should have a minimum standard of living and they should not be required to provide it on their own. Ultimately, advocates of a higher minimum wage who worry that they are subsidizing firms will likely be forced to contribute even more tax dollars to social programs since the wage for unemployed workers is $0.

Furthermore, why $15 and not $20? The argument is that $15/ hour is the minimum necessary to maintain a basic standard of living for working Americans but that argument is subjective. In fact, it can be extended to other areas. For example, should new hires be paid more than an entry-level salary so they can pay off college debt and maintain the standard of living of their parents?

To the extent that Americans deserve a particular lifestyle, providing it is a collective burden that should be shared by everyone. Politicians, clergy, union heads and other minimum wage supporters who want to push the entire burden onto firms are abandoning the moral obligation they claim we all share.

While minimum wage supporters mean well they appear to be blind to those who are harmed by wage controls. And those who are harmed are some of the most vulnerable members of the workforce – high school drop-outs, recent immigrants and urban youth. The minimum wage is a misguided policy that consigns these vulnerable members of the labor force to the basement of the economy and prevents any escape.

Teenage unemployment in cities

New research that examines New York’s Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) finds that participation in the program positively impacts student academic outcomes. As the authors state in the introduction, youth employment has many benefits:

“Prior research suggests that adolescent employment improves net worth and financial well-being as an adult. An emerging body of research indicates that summer employment programs also lead to decreases in violence and crime. Work experience may also benefit youth, and high school students specifically, by fostering various non-cognitive skills, such as positive work habits, time management, perseverance, and self-confidence.” (My bold)

This is hardly surprising news to anyone who had a summer job when they were young. An additional benefit from youth employment not mentioned by the authors is that the low-skill, low-paying jobs held by young people also provide them with information about what they don’t want to do when they grow up. Working in a fast food restaurant or at the counter of a store in the local mall helps a young person appreciate how hard it is to earn a dollar and provides a tangible reason to gain more skills in order to increase one’s productivity and earn a higher wage.

Unfortunately, many young people today are not obtaining these benefits. The chart below depicts the national teenage unemployment rate and labor force participation rate (LFP) from 2005 to 2015 using year-over-year August data from the BLS.

national teen unemp, LFP

During the Great Recession teenage employment fell drastically, as indicated by the simultaneous increase in the unemployment rate and decline in the LFP rate from 2007 to 2009. From its peak in 2010, the unemployment rate for 16 to 19 year olds declined slowly until 2012. This decline in the unemployment rate coincided with a decline in the LFP rate and thus the latter was partly responsible for the former’s decline. More recently, the labor force participation rate has flattened out while the unemployment rate has continued to decline, which means that more teenagers are finding jobs. But the teenagers who are employed are part of a much smaller labor pool than 10 years ago – nationally, only 33.7% of 16 to 19 year olds were in the labor force in August 2015, a sharp decline from 44% in 2005.

Full-time teenage employment is unique in that it has a relatively high opportunity cost – attending school full time. Out of the teenagers who work at least some portion of the year, most only work during the summer when school is not in session. Some teenagers also work during the school year, but this subset of teenage workers is smaller than the set who are employed during the summer months. Thus a decline in the LFP rate for teenagers may be a good thing if the teenagers who are exiting the labor force are doing so to concentrate on developing their human capital.

Unfortunately this does not seem to be the case. From 2005 to 2013 the enrollment rate of 16 and 17 year olds actually declined slightly from 95.1% to 93.7%.  The enrollment rate for 18 and 19 year olds stayed relatively constant – 67.6% in 2005 and 67.1% in 2013, with some mild fluctuations in between. These enrollment numbers coupled with the large decline in the teenage LFP rate do not support the story that a large number of working teenagers are exiting the labor force in order to attend school full time. Of course, they do not undermine the story that an increasing amount of teenagers who are both in the labor force and attending school at the same time are choosing to exit the labor force in order to focus on school. But if that is the primary reason, why is it happening now?

Examining national data is useful for identifying broad trends in teenage unemployment, but it conceals substantial intra-national differences. For this reason I examined teenage employment in 10 large U.S. cities (political cities, not MSAs) using employment status data from the 5-year American Community Survey (ACS Table S2301. 2012 was the latest data available for all ten cities).

The first figure below depicts the age 16 – 19 LFP rate for the period 2010 – 2012. As shown in the diagram there are substantial differences across cities.

City teenage LFP

For example, in New York (dark blue) only 23% of the 16 – 19 population was in the labor force in 2012 – down from 25% in 2010 – while in Denver 43.5% of the 16 – 19 population was in the labor force. Nearly every city experienced a decline over this time period, with only Atlanta (red line) experiencing a slight increase. Five cities were below the August 2012 national rate of 34% – Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, San Francisco, and New York.

Also, in contrast to the improving unemployment rate at the national level from 2010 – 12 shown in figure 1, the unemployment rate in each of these cities increased during that period. Figure 3 below depicts the unemployment rate for each of the 10 cities.

City teenage unemp rate

In August 2012 the national unemployment rate for 16 – 19 year olds was 24.3%, a rate that was exceeded by all 10 cities analyzed here. Atlanta had the highest unemployment rate in 2012 at 48%. Atlanta’s high unemployment rate and relatively low LFP rate reveals how few Atlanta teens were employed during this period and how difficult it was for those who wanted a job to find one.

The unemployment rate may increase because employment declines or more unemployed people enter the labor force, which would increase the labor force participation rate. Figures 2 and 3 together indicate that the unemployment rate increased in each of these cities due to a decline in employment, not increased labor force participation.

The preceding figures are evidence that the teenage employment situation in these major cities is getting worse both over time and relative to other areas in the country. To the extent that teenage employment benefits young people, fewer and fewer of them are receiving these benefits. From the linked article:

“The substantial drop in teen employment prospects has had a devastating effect on the nation’s youngest teens (16-17), males, blacks, low income youth, and inner city, minority males,” wrote Andrew Sum in a report on teen summer employment for the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University. “Those youth who need work experience the most get it the least, another example of the upside down world of labor markets in the past decade.”

Unfortunately, in many cities the response to this situation will only exacerbate the problem. Seattle and Los Angeles have already approved local $15 minimum wages, and a similar law in the state of New York that applies only to fast food franchises was recently approved by the state’s wage board. While many people still question the effect of a minimum wage on overall employment, there is substantial empirical evidence that a relatively high minimum wage has a negative effect on employment for the least skilled workers, which includes inner-city teenagers who often attend mediocre schools. Thus it is hard to believe that any of the seemingly well-intentioned increases in the minimum wage that are occurring around the country will have a positive effect on the urban teenage employment situation presented here. A better response would be to eliminate the minimum wage so that in the short run low-skilled workers are able to offer their labor at a price that is commensurate to its value. In the long run worker productivity must be increased which involves K-12 school reform.