Tag Archives: American Legislative Exchange Council

New Edition of Rich States, Poor States out this Week

The fifth edition of Rich States, Poor States  from the American Legislative Exchange Council is now available. Utah took the top spot in the ranking of states’ economic competitiveness, as it has every year the study has been produced. Utah excels in the ranking system because it is a right-to-work state, it has a flat personal income tax, and no estate tax, among other factors considered in the study.

The other states that round out the top ten for Economic Outlook include South Dakota, Virginia, Wyoming, North Dakota, Idaho, Missouri, Colorado, Arizona, and Georgia. On the bottom end of the ranking, the states with the worst Economic Outlook are Hawaii, Maine, Illinois, Vermont, and New York at number 50 for the fourth year in a row.

Several measures of economic competitiveness offer supporting evidence that these states have some of the worst policies for business including Mercatus’ Freedom in the 50 States and the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index.

The authors of Rich States, Poor States, Arthur Laffer, Stephen Moore, and Jonathan Williams demonstrate Tiebout Competition in action. They find a strong correlation between the states that have high Economic Outlook rankings with the states that are experiencing the highest population growth through domestic migration. Likewise, the states that experienced the largest losses due to out-migration include Ohio and New York, ranking 37th and 50th respectively.

The study draws attention to the role that unfunded pension liabilities play for states’ future competitiveness, as this debt will require difficult and unpopular policy decisions as current tax dollars have to be used to fund past promises. Laffer, Moore, and Williams draw a comparison between Wisconsin’s recent reforms that put it on a more sustainable path compared to its neighbor Illinois:

In stark contrast to Wisconsin’s successes, the story in Illinois is not so uplifting. Over the last 10 years, Illinois legislators have continuously ignored the pension burden in their state—so much so that Illinois has one of the worst pension systems in the nation, with an estimated unfunded liability ranging from $54 billion to $192 billion, depending on your actuarial assumptions. Furthermore, the official state estimates do not include the $17.8 billion in pension obligation bond payments that are owed. In addition, Illinois policymakers have spent beyond their means, borrowed money they don’t have, and made promises to public employee unions that they cannot fulfill. Not only did Illinois face significant unfunded pension liabilities, but also lawmakers had to confront large deficits and potential cuts to state programs.

While the policies that improve state economic competitiveness are clear, the path to achieving them is difficult after voters grow accustomed to programs that their states cannot afford. However the bitter medicine of reform is worthwhile, as we know that economic freedom is not only better for business, but evidence shows it also improves individuals’ well-being.

Tax Foundation Releases New State Business Tax Climate Index

On Wednesday the Tax Foundation released the updated State Business Tax Climate Index by Mark Robyn. Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nevada ranked highest on the index because they have low overall tax burdens and tax policies that introduce minimal distortions to business behavior.

The three states at the bottom of the ranking — New Jersey, New York, and California — were also the worst-ranked states last year. Unsurprisingly, these three states are also experiencing domestic outmigration as individuals and businesses leave for locations with lower tax burdens. A study by Jed Kolko, David Neumark, and Marisol Cuella Mejia demonstrates that the SBTCI is one of the most accurate indexes for predicting economic outcomes.

 

Illinois had the largest change in ranking over last year’s, dropping 12 spots. Robyn writes on the importance of tax policy in business decisions:

Anecdotes about the impact of state tax systems on business investment are plentiful. In Illinois early last decade, hundreds of millions of dollars of capital investments were delayed when then-Governor Blagojevich proposed a hefty gross receipts tax. Only when the legislature resoundingly defeated the bill did the investment resume. In 2005, California-based Intel decided to build a multi-billion dollar chip-making facility in Arizona due to its favorable corporate income tax system. In 2010 Northrup Grumman chose to move its headquarters to Virginia over Maryland, citing the better business tax climate. Anecdotes such as these reinforce what we know from economic theory: taxes matter to businesses, and those places with the most competitive tax systems will reap the benefits of business-friendly tax climates.

The Tax Foundation is not alone in finding these states relatively lacking in economic freedom. Indexes developed by the Mercatus Center and the American Legislative Exchange Council also ranked these states as among the least economically competitive in the country.

While lawmakers may be tempted to try to improve their states’ rankings in these types of indexes with special business tax breaks or increasing state spending, all three studies demonstrate that the best way to improve a state’s competitiveness ranking is to provide a climate of low, stable taxes that do not favor specific industries.

 

The State Budget Reform Toolkit

This month, thousands of new public servants take their seats in statehouses across the country. They face a tough task. For the third year in a row, most states face enormous budget gaps. In the past two years, the states have been able to cobble together balanced budgets with revenue increases, federal aid, spending cuts, and gimmicks. (The gimmicks include skipping pension payments, borrowing to “close the deficit” (!), and altering the fiscal calendar to shift revenue from the next year to the current one.)

As difficult as these problems are, the long-term budget problems loom larger.

In light of the tough tasks ahead of them, legislators will need to be well-armed with ideas for meaningful and sustainable budget reforms.

Today, the American Legislative Exchange Council released the State Budget Reform Toolkit:

It is chock-full of ideas drawn from past experience and research. I, of course, am biased; I am a contributing editor.

More on Texas and California

The cover story of this week’s Economist discusses Rich States, Poor States, the report published earlier this year by the American Legislative Exchange Council.  The subject of an earlier post, the book attributes Texas’ rapidly growing domestic-born population to low tax rates and favorable business conditions and suggests that California’s loss of domestic population is due to a state government that has grown unsustainably large.

The article points out that in addition to increasing numbers of native-born Americans, Texas along with many other states is experiencing large increases in its population of immigrants from Mexico and Central and South America.  While these large numbers are presenting some challenges to the state’s healthcare and education systems, another piece points out:

Texas has proved far better than the other border states (California, New Mexico, and Arizona) at adapting to the new, peaceful reconquista. In California, Proposition 187, which cracked down hard on illegal immigration, was heartily backed by the then Republican governor and passed in a referendum in 1994, though it was later struck down by a federal court. This kind of thing has only ever been attempted in Texas at local level, and even then only very rarely.

For the most part, Texans seem to see immigrants as adding to the diverse skills in the labor market, increasing the size of the economic pie for all of the state’s residents, rather than acting as a drain on fixed resources.

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Rich States, Poor States

For anyone who hasn’t yet seen it, the American Legislative Exchange Council recently related their “Rich States, Poor States” economic competitiveness index, updated for 2009. The authors — Arthur Laffer, Steve Moore, and Jonathan Williams — look at policies that impact state economic competitiveness and rank the states accordingly.

Of particular interest this year is a comparative case study between California and Texas that is likely to ruffle some feathers in the Golden State and lead to some self-congratulation in the Lone Star State.