Tag Archives: Chicago Board Options Exchange

Municipal pension news: Baltimore to offer DC plan

Earlier this month, Baltimore’s city council approved a measure to give the city’s workers a choice between a defined contribution or defined benefit plan plan. According to Pensions and Investments, new hires will contribute 5 percent of their salary to whichever plan they choose, a significant increase from the 1 percent that workers were required to begin contributing to the city’s pension system last year. (Previously, workers had not contributed to their pension). As the article notes, the choice between a DB and a DC plan is a compromise. Mayor Rawlings-Blake preferred to move all newly hired employees to a DC plan, but this was not agreed upon by unions. In total, Baltimore two pension systems have an unfunded liability of $1.4 billion on a GASB-basis.

Baltimore’s proposed reforms are a bit stronger than the plan currently considered by Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel, which is largely focused on filling in very daunting funding gaps in the city’s multiple plans. The Wall Street Journal reports that the mayor’s plan to raise property taxes by $250 million represents an increase of about $50 a year for the owner of a $250,000 home. And, it’s not enough to cover the gap. The state will demand an additional $600 million in annual payments for the city’s police and fire funds by 2016. In addition, Mayor Emanuel proposes benefit cuts, such as  increased employee contributions and reduced COLAs. But structural reforms aren’t being pushed too strongly, instead, the focus in Chicago appears to be a search for more revenues. Consider a proposal floated by The Chicago Teachers Union. They would like to see a per-transaction tax levied on futures, options, and stock trades processed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) and Chicago Board Options Exchange.  Both the CME and Mayor Emanuel oppose the idea recognizing that it will simply drive the financial industry out of town.