Tag Archives: economy

Washington’s Legitimacy Crisis Presents an Opportunity for the States

You’ve heard it before. Americans are deeply unhappy with Washington, DC. Sixty-five percent say the country is on the wrong track. Confidence in institutions is near all-time lows. Congress’s approval rating is terrible, and the two major presidential candidates are viewed more negatively than any other mainstream presidential candidates in recent memory. Only nineteen percent of the public trust the government to do the right thing all or most of the time.

Washington’s dysfunction—what is probably driving these perceptions—extends to all three branches of the federal government. Congress is in a near-permanent state of gridlock. The president uses his executive authority wherever possible, but often with little practical impact. Even regulatory agencies are facing what Brookings Institution scholar Philip Wallach has dubbed a legitimacy crisis of the administrative state, as the public grows more skeptical of leaving the most important policymaking decisions to insulated and unelected regulators.

The courts are in little better shape. Since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court has been hobbled without its ninth member. Even before this development, there was a perception building that politics too often enters the Court’s decisions, no doubt contributing to the gradual increase in the Supreme Court’s disapproval rating over time.

On a brighter note, in contrast to this crisis of legitimacy at the federal level, polling data suggests that Americans still generally trust their state and local governments. The cop on the beat, the garbage man, and the postal worker, are still trusted symbols of everyday American life.  Furthermore, the social divisions that make dramatic change at the federal level difficult (i.e. red state versus blue state stuff) actually make it easier to get things done in the states.

Where governorships and state legislatures are dominated by a single party, there are opportunities to advance creative policy solutions, allowing the states to fulfill their roles as laboratories of democracy. Policy reforms in the states, where successful, can lay the groundwork for future changes at the federal level, perhaps restoring badly-needed trust in our ailing institutions.

There are a many reasons to be cynical about where the country is headed, and to doubt whether our leaders are capable of addressing our looming challenges. However, the states should not be made complacent by this state of affairs. They should view Washington’s dysfunction as an opportunity and not a reason for despair. Now is an opportune moment to step up and demonstrate what it means to govern. Perhaps…just perhaps… our friends in Washington might pay attention and learn something.

Does Tax Increment Financing (TIF) generate economic development?

Tax increment financing, or TIF, is a method of financing economic development projects first used in California in 1952. Since then, 48 other states have enacted TIF legislation with Arizona being the lone holdout. It was originally conceived as a method for combating urban blight, but over time it has become the go-to tool for local politicians pushing economic development in general. For example, Baltimore is considering using TIF to raise $535 million to help Under Armor founder Kevin Plank develop Port Covington.

So how does TIF work? Though the particulars can vary by state, the basic mechanism is usually similar. First, an area is designated as a TIF district. TIF districts are mostly industrial or commercial areas rather than residential areas since the goal is to encourage economic development.

Usually, in an effort to ensure that TIF is used appropriately, the municipal government that designates the area as a TIF has to assert that economic development would not take place absent the TIF designation and subsequent investment. This is known as the ‘but-for’ test, since the argument is that development would not occur but for the TIF. Though the ‘but-for’ test is still applied, some argue that it is largely pro forma.

Once an area has been designated as a TIF district, the property values in the area are assessed in order to create a baseline value. The current property tax rate is applied to the baseline assessed value to determine the amount of revenue that is used for the provision of local government goods and services (roads, police, fire, water etc.). This value will then be frozen for a set period of time (e.g. up to 30 years in North Carolina), and any increase in assessed property values that occurs after this time and the subsequent revenue generated will be used to pay for the economic development project(s) in the TIF district.

The key idea is that municipalities can borrow against the projected property value increases in order to pay for current economic development projects. A simple numerical example will help clarify how TIF works.

In the table below there are five years. In year 1 the assessed value of the property in the TIF district is $20 million and it is determined that it takes $1 million per year to provide the government goods and services needed in the area (road maintenance, sewage lines, police/fire protection, etc.). A tax rate of 5% is applied to the $20 million of assessed value to raise the necessary $1 million (Tax revenue column).

TIF example table

The municipality issues bonds totaling $1 million to invest in an economic development project in the TIF district. As an example, let’s say the project is renovating an old business park in order to make it more attractive to 21st century startups. The plan is that improving the business park will make the area more desirable and increase the property values in the TIF district. As the assessed value increases the extra tax revenue raised by applying the 5% rate to the incremental value of the property will be used to pay off the bonds (incremental revenue column).

Meanwhile, the $1 million required for providing the government goods and services will remain intact, since only the incremental increase in assessed value is used to pay for the business park improvements. Hence the term Tax Increment Financing.

As shown in the table, if the assessed value of the property increases by $2 million per year for 4 years the municipality will recoup the $1 million required to amortize the bond (I’m omitting interest to keep it simple). Each $1 million dollars of increased value increase tax revenue by $50,000 without increasing the tax rate, which is what allows the municipality to pay for the economic development without raising property tax rates. For many city officials this is an attractive feature since property owners usually don’t like tax rate increases.

City officials may also prefer TIF to the issuance of general obligation bonds since the latter often require voter approval while TIF does not. This is the case in North Carolina. TIF supporters claim that this gives city officials more flexibility in dealing with the particular needs of development projects. However, it also allows influential individuals to push TIF through for projects that a majority of voters may not support.

While TIF can be used for traditional government goods like roads, sewer systems, water systems, and public transportation, it can also be used for private goods like business parks and sports facilities. The former arguably provide direct benefits to all firms in the TIF district since better roads, streetscapes and water systems can be used by any firm in the area. The latter projects, though they may provide indirect benefits to nearby firms in the form of more attractive surroundings and increased property values, mostly benefit the owners of entity receiving the development funding. Like other development incentives, TIF can be used to subsidize private businesses with taxpayer dollars.

Projects that use TIF are often described as ‘self-financing’ since the project itself is supposedly what creates the higher property values that pay for it. Additionally, TIF is often sold to voters as a way to create jobs or spur additional private investment in blighted areas. But there is no guarantee that the development project will lead to increased private sector investment, more jobs or higher property values. Researchers at the UNC School of Government explain the risks of TIF in a 2008 Economic Bulletin:

“Tax increment financing is not a silver bullet solution to development problems. There is no guarantee that the initial public investment will spur sufficient private investment, over time, that creates enough increment to pay back the bonds. Moreover, even if the investment succeeds on paper, it may do so by “capturing” growth that would have occurred even without the investment. Successful TIF districts can place an additional strain on existing public resources like schools and parks, whose funding is frozen at base valuation levels while growth in the district increases demand for their services.”

The researchers also note that it’s often larger corporations that municipalities are trying to attract with TIF dollars, and any subsidies via TIF that the municipality provides to the larger firm gives it an advantage over its already-established, local competitors. This is even more unfair when the local competitor is a small, mom-and-pop business that already faces a difficult challenge due to economies of scale.

There is also little evidence that TIF regularly provides the job or private sector investment that its supporters promise. Chicago is one of the largest users of TIF for economic development and its program has been one of the most widely studied. Research on Chicago’s TIF program found that “Overall, TIF failed to produce the promise of jobs, business development or real estate activity at the neighborhood level beyond what would have occurred without TIF.”

If economic development projects that rely on TIF do not generate additional development above and beyond what would have occurred anyway, then the additional tax revenue due to the higher assessed values is used to pay for an economic development project that didn’t really add anything. Without TIF, that revenue could have been used for providing other government goods and services such as infrastructure or better police and fire protection. Once TIF is used, the additional revenue must be used to pay for the economic development project: it cannot be spent on other services that residents might prefer.

Another study, also looking at the Chicago metro area, found that cities that adopt TIF experience slower property value growth than those that do not. The authors suggest that this is due to a reallocation of resources to TIF districts from other areas of the city. The result is that the TIF districts grow at the expense of the municipality as a whole. This is an example of the TIF working on paper, but only because it is pilfering growth that would have occurred in other areas of the city.

Local politicians often like tax increment financing because it is relatively flexible and enables them to be entrepreneurial in some sense: local officials as venture capitalists. It’s also an easier sell than a tax rate increase or general obligation bonds that require a voter referendum.

But politicians tend to make bad venture capitalists for several reasons. First, it’s usually not their area of expertise and it’s hard: even the professionals occasionally lose money. Second, as Milton Friedman pointed out, people tend to be more careless when spending other people’s money. Local officials aren’t investing their own money in these projects, and when people invest or spend other people’s money they tend to emphasize the positive outcomes and downplay the negative ones since they aren’t directly affected. Third, pecuniary factors don’t always drive the decision. Different politicians like different industries and businesses – green energy, biotech, advanced manufacturing, etc. – for various reasons and their subjective, non-pecuniary preferences may cause them to ignore the underlying financials of a project and support a bad investment.

If TIF is going to be used it should be used on things like public infrastructure – roads, sewer/water lines, sidewalks – rather than specific private businesses. This makes it harder to get distracted by non-pecuniary factors and does a better – though not perfect – job of directly helping development in general rather than a specific company or private developer. But taxpayers should be aware of the dangers of TIF and politicians and developers should not tout it as a panacea for jump-starting an area’s economy.

Baltimore’s misguided move to raise its minimum wage will harm its most vulnerable

Baltimore’s city council, like others around the country, is considering raising the city’s minimum wage to $15 per hour. This is an ill-advised move that will make it harder for young people and the least skilled to find employment, which is already a difficult task in Baltimore.

The figure below shows the age 16 – 19 labor force participation (LFP) rate, employment rate, and unemployment rate in Baltimore City from 2009 to 2014 (most recent data available). The data are from the American Community Survey table S2301.

baltimore 16-19 emp stats

As shown in the figure, the LFP rate declined along with the employment rate, which has caused the unemployment rate to hold steady at approximately 40% (red line). So 40% of Baltimore’s unemployed teens were searching for a job but couldn’t find one and only 20% of all teens were actually employed, a decline of 4 percentage points (blue line). How is increasing the minimum wage to $15 per hour going to help the 40% who are looking for a job find one?

The minimum wage increase may help some people who are able to keep their job at the higher wage, but for the 40% who can’t find a job at the current minimum wage of $8.25, an increase to $15 is only going to make the task harder, if not impossible. Who is standing up for these people?

The data are just as gloomy when looking at workers with less than a high school degree, which is another group that is severely impacted by a higher minimum wage. As the figure below shows, the employment rate is falling while the unemployment rate is rising.

baltimore lt hs emp stats

In 2009 over 42% of people in this skill group were employed (blue line). In 2014 only 37% were, a decline of five percentage points. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate increased from about 19% to over 25% (red line). And all of this occurred while the economy was supposedly improving.

Again we should ask; how is a higher minimum wage going to help the 25% of high school dropouts in Baltimore who are unemployed find a job? It won’t. Unemployed workers do not become more attractive as employees simply because the city council mandates a higher wage.

What’s going to happen is that more people in this skill group will become discouraged and leave the labor market entirely. Then they will earn $0 per hour indefinitely and be forced to rely entirely on family, friends, and public assistance to live. A $15 minimum wage destroys their chances of finding meaningful employment and unduly deprives them of opportunities to better their lives.

This is the unseen effect of minimum wage hikes that $15 supporters rarely acknowledge. When faced with the higher cost, firms will hire workers who can justify a $15 wage and those who cannot will be unable to find employment. Additionally, firms will start using more technology and automation instead of workers. This happens because consumers want low prices and high quality, and as the minimum wage increases technology and capital become the best way to give consumers what they want. Over time workers in states with lower minimum wages may be forced out of the labor market as well as new technologies spread from high minimum wage areas to low minimum wage areas.

Another common argument put forth by minimum wage supporters is that taxpayers subsidize firms that pay low wages. But this is not true. Firms like Wal-Mart, McDonalds, and the countless other large and small business that employ low-skill workers are doing their part by giving people an opportunity. Firm owners did not unilaterally decide that all Americans should have a minimum standard of living and they should not be required to provide it on their own. Ultimately, advocates of a higher minimum wage who worry that they are subsidizing firms will likely be forced to contribute even more tax dollars to social programs since the wage for unemployed workers is $0.

Furthermore, why $15 and not $20? The argument is that $15/ hour is the minimum necessary to maintain a basic standard of living for working Americans but that argument is subjective. In fact, it can be extended to other areas. For example, should new hires be paid more than an entry-level salary so they can pay off college debt and maintain the standard of living of their parents?

To the extent that Americans deserve a particular lifestyle, providing it is a collective burden that should be shared by everyone. Politicians, clergy, union heads and other minimum wage supporters who want to push the entire burden onto firms are abandoning the moral obligation they claim we all share.

While minimum wage supporters mean well they appear to be blind to those who are harmed by wage controls. And those who are harmed are some of the most vulnerable members of the workforce – high school drop-outs, recent immigrants and urban youth. The minimum wage is a misguided policy that consigns these vulnerable members of the labor force to the basement of the economy and prevents any escape.

Where’s the growth?

In a famous Wendy’s commercial from 1984, three elderly women are examining a hamburger with a rather large bun when one of them asks “Where’s the beef?” in order to express her disappointment that the burger is all bun and no meat. When it comes to the economy growth is like the beef of a burger – without it all you’re left with is fluff and filler.

For the last 8 years the US economy has been mostly fluff and filler. Sure unemployment is down, but that is largely due to a lower labor force participation rate. Wage growth has been anemic and total GDP growth remains below the pre-recession long-run average of 3%.  GDP per capita growth is weak too.

Within a country as large as the US different regions are going to have different levels of GDP per capita and different growth rates for a variety of reasons including labor force characteristics, industry composition, weather, and geography. In order to examine the differences across the US, the graph below depicts the natural log of real GDP per capita in 2009 dollars for the 9 census divisions from 2001 to 2014. Because the natural log is on the y-axis the slope of the line corresponds to the growth rate between years. The black line is the US Metropolitan Area average and does not include rural areas.

ln real per cap gdp by cen div 2001-14

I created the census division average by generating a population weighted average of the real per capita GDP of the Metropolitan Statistical Areas located in each division. The weights are adjusted for each year in the data. Also, since the averages discussed in this post do not include rural areas one can think of them as the urban average in each census division. The population data for the weights and the real GDP per capita data are from the BEA.

As shown in the graph, the highest average real GDP per capita is in the New England division (orange) while the lowest is in the East South Central (purple), although as of 2014 the Mountain is not far ahead.

The slopes of the lines are steeper on average prior to the recession, indicating that the regions were growing faster during the pre-recession period. This is particularly noticeable in the Mountain and South Atlantic division, where real GDP per capita growth has essentially been zero (flat line) since 2009. Growth has also slowed considerably in the Pacific division (dark blue). Only in the East North Central (yellow) and West South Central (brown) does it appear that growth has reached or eclipsed its pre-recession rate.

The next graph below shows the average real per capita GDP by census division in three separate years – 2001, 2007, and 2014. This makes it easier to see the changes in levels over time.

real per cap gdp by cen div 2001,07,14

Real GDP per capita was higher in 2014 than in 2007 (year prior to the recession) in only three divisions – the Mid Atlantic, West North Central, and West South Central. The rest of the country has experienced either no gain or a decrease in the case of the South Atlantic and Mountain divisions. Together these graphs are hardly evidence of a strong economy.

High per capita GDP is not a perfect measure of economic prosperity but it is strongly correlated with many of the other things people care about. Countries with a higher level of per capita GDP are healthier, freer, and happier. The data presented here show that the US economy is struggling when it comes to growth, especially in the South Atlantic and Mountain divisions where people have become worse off on average. Whoever the next president is, he or she needs to come up with an answer to the question – Where’s the growth?

 

City population dynamics since 1850

The reason why some cities grow and some cities shrink is a heavily debated topic in economics, sociology, urban planning, and public administration. In truth, there is no single reason why a city declines. Often exogenous factors – new modes of transportation, increased globalization, institutional changes, and federal policies – initiate the decline while subsequent poor political management can exacerbate it. This post focuses on the population trends of America’s largest cities since 1850 and how changes in these factors affected the distribution of people within the US.

When water transportation, water power, and proximity to natural resources such as coal were the most important factors driving industrial productivity, businesses and people congregated in locations near major waterways for power and shipping purposes. The graph below shows the top 10 cities* by population in 1850 and follows them until 1900. The rank of the city is on the left axis.

top cities 1850-1900

 

* The 9th, 11th, and 12th ranked cities in 1850 were all incorporated into Philadelphia by 1860. Pittsburgh was the next highest ranked city (13th) that was not incorporated so I used it in the graph instead.

All of the largest cities were located on heavily traveled rivers (New Orleans, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis) or on the coast and had busy ports (New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, and Baltimore). Albany, NY may seem like an outlier but it was the starting point of the Erie Canal.

As economist Ed Glaeser (2005) notes “…almost every large northern city in the US as of 1860 became an industrial powerhouse over the next 60 years as factories started in central locations where they could save transport costs and make use of large urban labor forces.”

Along with waterways, railroads were an important mode of transportation from 1850 – 1900 and many of these cities had important railroads running through them, such as the B&O through Balitmore and the Erie Railroad in New York. The increasing importance of railroads impacted the list of top 10 cities in 1900 as shown below.

top cities 1900-1950

A similar but not identical set of cities dominated the urban landscape over the next 50 years. By 1900, New Orleans, Brooklyn (merged with New York) Albany, and Pittsburgh were replaced by Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo, and San Francisco. Chicago, Cleveland, and Buffalo are all located on the Great Lakes and thus had water access, but it was the increasing importance of railroad shipping and travel that helped their populations grow. Buffalo was on the B&O railroad and was also the terminal point of the Erie Canal. San Francisco became much more accessible after the completion of the Pacific Railroad in 1869, but the California Gold Rush in the late 1840s got its population growth started.

As rail and eventually automobile/truck transportation became more important during the early 1900s, cities that relied on strategic river locations began to decline. New Orleans was already out of the top 10 by 1900 (falling from 5th to 12th) and Cincinnati went from 10th in 1900 to 18th by 1950. Buffalo also fell out of the top 10 during this time period, declining from 8th to 15th. But despite some changes in the rankings, there was only one warm-weather city in the top 10 as late as 1950 (Los Angeles). However, as the next graphs shows there was a surge in the populations of warm-weather cities during the period from 1950 to 2010 that caused many of the older Midwestern cities to fall out of the rankings.

top cities 1950-2010

The largest shakeup in the population rankings occurred during this period. Out of the top 10 cities in 1950, only 4 (Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York) were still in the top 10 in 2010 (All were in the top 5, with Houston – 4th in 2010 – being the only city not already ranked in the top 10 in 1950, when it was 14th). The cities ranked 6 – 10 fell out of the top 20 while Detroit declined from 5th to 18th. The large change in the rankings during this time period is striking when compared to the relative stability of the earlier time periods.

Economic changes due to globalization and the prevalence of right-to-work laws in the southern states, combined with preferences for warm weather and other factors have resulted in both population and economic decline in many major Midwestern and Northeastern cities. All of the new cities in the top ten in 2010 have relatively warm weather: Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, Dallas, and San Jose. Some large cities missing from the 2010 list – particularly San Francisco and perhaps Washington D.C. and Boston as well – would probably be ranked higher if not for restrictive land-use regulations that artificially increase housing prices and limit population growth. In those cities and other smaller cities – primarily located in Southern California – low population growth is a goal rather than a result of outside forces.

The only cold-weather cities that were in the top 15 in 2014 that were not in the top 5 in 1950 were Indianapolis, IN (14th) and Columbus, OH (15th). These two cities not only avoided the fate of nearby Detroit and Cleveland, they thrived. From 1950 to 2014 Columbus’ population grew by 122% and Indianapolis’ grew by 99%. This is striking compared to the 57% decline in Cleveland and the 63% decline in Detroit during the same time period.

So why have Columbus and Indianapolis grown since 1950 while every other large city in the Midwest has declined? There isn’t an obvious answer. One thing among many that both Columbus and Indianapolis have in common is that they are both state capitals. State spending as a percentage of Gross State Product (GSP) has been increasing since 1970 across the country as shown in the graph below.

OH, IN state spending as per GSP

In Ohio state spending growth as a percentage of GSP has outpaced the nation since 1970. It is possible that increased state spending in Ohio and Indiana is crowding out private investment in other parts of those states. And since much of the money collected by the state ends up being spent in the capital via government wages, both Columbus and Indianapolis grow relative to other cities in their respective states.

There has also been an increase in state level regulation over time. As state governments become larger players in the economy business leaders will find it more and more beneficial to be near state legislators and governors in order to lobby for regulations that help their company or for exemptions from rules that harm it. Company executives who fail to get a seat at the table when regulations are being drafted may find that their competitors have helped draft rules that put them at a competitive disadvantage. The decline of manufacturing in the Midwest may have created an urban reset that presented firms and workers with an opportunity to migrate to areas that have a relative abundance of an increasingly important factor of production – government.

Puerto Rico’s labor market woes

Puerto Rico – a U.S. territory – has $72 billion dollars in outstanding debt, which is dangerously high in a country with a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of only $103.1 billion. The Puerto Rican government failed to pay creditors in August and this was viewed as a default by the credit rating agency Moody’s, which had already downgraded Puerto Rico’s bonds to junk status earlier this year. The Obama administration has proposed allowing Puerto Rico to declare bankruptcy, which would allow it to negotiate with creditors and eliminate some of its debt. Currently only municipalities – not states or territories – are allowed to declare bankruptcy under U.S. law. Several former Obama administration officials have come out in favor of the plan, including former Budget Director Peter Orszag and former Director of the National Economic Council Larry Summers. Others are warning that bankruptcy is not a cure-all and that more structural reforms need to take place. Many of these pundits have pointed out that Puerto Rico’s labor market is a mess and that people are leaving the country in droves. Since 2010 over 200,000 people have migrated from Puerto Rico, decreasing its population to just over 3.5 million. This steady loss of the tax base has increased the debt burden on those remaining and has made it harder for Puerto Rico to get out of debt.

To get a sense of Puerto Rico’s situation, the figure below shows the poverty rate of Puerto Rico along with that of three US states that will be used throughout this post as a means of comparison: California (wealthy state), Ohio (medium-wealth state), and Mississippi (low-wealth state). All the data are 1-year ACS data from American FactFinder.

puerto rico poverty

The poverty rate in Puerto Rico is very high compared to these states. Mississippi’s poverty rate is high by US standards and was approximately 22% in 2014, but Puerto Rico’s dwarfed it at over 45%. Assisting Puerto Rico with their immediate debt problem will do little to fix this issue.

A government requires taxes in order to provide services, and taxes are primarily collected from people who work in the regular economy via income taxes. A small labor force with relatively few employed workers makes it difficult for a county to raises taxes to provide services and pay off debt. Puerto Rico has a very low labor force participation (LFP) rate relative to mainland US states and a very low employment rate. The graphs below plot Puerto Rico’s LFP rate and employment rate along with the rates of California, Mississippi, and Ohio.

puerto rico labor force

puerto rico employ rate

As shown in the figures, Puerto Rico’s employment rate and LFP rate are far below the rates of the US states including one of the poorest states, Mississippi. In 2014 less than 45% of Puerto Rico’s 16 and over population was in the labor force and only about 35% of the 16 and over population was employed. In Mississippi the LFP rate was 58% while the employment rate was 52%. Additionally, the employment rate fell in Puerto Rico from 2010-14 while it rose in each of the other three states. So at a time when the labor market was improving on the mainland things were getting worse in Puerto Rico.

An educated labor force is an important input in the production process and it is especially important for generating innovation and entrepreneurship. The figure below shows the percent of people 25 and over in each area that have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

puerto rico gt 24 education attain

Puerto Rico has a relatively educated labor force compared to Mississippi, though it trails Ohio and California. The percentage also increased over this time period, though it appears to have stabilized after 2012 while continuing to grow in the other states.

Puerto Rico has nice beaches and weather, so a high percentage of educated people over the age of 25 may simply be due to a high percentage of educated retirees residing in Puerto Rico to take advantage of its geographic amenities. The next figure shows the percentage of 25 to 44 year olds with a bachelor’s degree or higher. I examined this age group to see if the somewhat surprising percentage of people with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Puerto Rico is being driven by educated older workers and retirees who are less likely to help reinvigorate the Puerto Rican economy going forward.

puerto rico 25to44 educ attain

As shown in the graph, Puerto Rico actually fares better when looking at the 25 – 44 age group, especially from 2010-12. In 2012 Puerto Rico had a higher percentage of educated people in this age group than Ohio.

Since then, however, Puerto Rico’s percentage declined slightly while Ohio’s rose, along with Mississippi’s and California’s. The decline in Puerto Rico was driven by a decline in the percentage of people 35 to 44 with a bachelor’s or higher as shown in the next figure below.

puerto rico 35to44 educ attain

The percentage of 35 to 44 year olds with a bachelor’s or advanced degree fell from 32% in 2012 to 29.4% in 2014 while it rose in the other three states. This is evidence that educated people in their prime earning years left the territory during this period, most likely to work in the US where there are more opportunities and wages are higher. This “bright flight” is a bad sign for Puerto Rico’s economy.

One of the reforms that many believe will help Puerto Rico is an exemption from compliance with federal minimum wage laws. Workers in Puerto Rico are far less productive than in the US, and thus a $7.25 minimum wage has a large effect on employment. Businesses cannot afford to pay low-skill workers in Puerto Rico such a high wage because the workers simply do not produce enough value to justify it. The graph below shows the median individual yearly income in each area divided by the full time federal minimum wage income of $15,080.

puerto rico min wage ratio

As shown in the graph, Puerto Rico’s ratio was the highest by a substantial amount. The yearly income from earning the minimum wage was about 80% of the yearly median income in Puerto Rico over this period, while it was only about 40% in Mississippi and less in Ohio and California. By this measure, California’s minimum wage would need to be $23.82 – which is equal to $49,546 per year – to equal the ratio in Puerto Rico. California’s actual minimum wage is $9 and it’s scheduled to increase to $10 in 2016. I don’t think there’s a single economist who would argue that more than doubling the minimum wage in California would have no effect on employment.

The preceding figures do not paint a rosy picture of Puerto Rico: Its poverty rate is high and trending up, less than half of the people over 16 are in the labor force and only about a third are actually employed, educated people appear to be leaving the country, and the minimum wage is a severe hindrance on hiring. Any effort by the federal government to help Puerto Rico needs to take these problems into account. Ultimately the Puerto Rican government needs to be enabled and encouraged to institute reforms that will help grow Puerto Rico’s economy. Without fundamental reforms that increase economic opportunity in Puerto Rico people will continue to leave, further weakening the commonwealth’s economy and making additional defaults more likely.

 

 

The cost disease and the privatization of government services

Many US municipalities are facing budget problems (see here, here, and here). The real cost of providing traditional public services like police, fire protection, and education is increasing, often at a rate that exceeds revenue growth. The graph below shows the real per-capita expenditure increase in five US cities from 1951 to 2006. (Data are from the census file IndFin_1967-2012.zip and are adjusted for inflation using the US GDP chained price index.)

real per cap spend

In 1951 none of the cities were spending more than $1,000 per person. In 2006 every city was spending well over that amount, with Buffalo spending almost $5,000 per person. Even Fresno, which had the smallest increase, increased per capita spending from $480 to $1,461 – an increase of 204%. Expenditure growth that exceeds revenue growth leads to budget deficits and can eventually result in cuts in services. Economist William Baumol attributes city spending growth to what is known as the “cost disease”.

In his 1967 paper, Baumol argues that municipalities will face rising costs of providing “public” goods and services over time as the relative productivity of labor declines in the industries controlled by local governments versus those of the private sector. As labor in the private sector becomes more productive over time due to increases in capital, wages will increase. Goods and services traditionally supplied by local governments such as police, fire protection, and education have not experienced similar increases in capital or productivity. K-12 education is a particularly good example of stagnation – a teacher from the 1950s would not confront much of a learning curve if they had to teach in a 21st century classroom. However, in order to attract competent and productive teachers, for example, local governments must increase wages to levels that are competitive with the wages that teachers could earn in the private sector. When this occurs, teacher’s wages increase even though their productivity does not. As a result, cities end up paying more money for the same amount of work. Baumol sums up the effect:

“The bulk of municipal services is, in fact, of this general stamp [non-progressive] and our model tells us clearly what can be expected as a result…inexorably and cumulatively, whether or not there is inflation, administrative mismanagement or malfeasance, municipal budgets will almost certainly continue to mount in the future, just as they have been doing in the past. This is a trend for which no man and no group should be blamed, for there is nothing than can be done to stop it.” (Baumol, 1967 p.423)

But is there really nothing than can be done to cure the cost disease? Baumol himself later acknowledged that innovation may yet occur in the relatively stagnant sectors of the economy such as education:

“…an activity which is, say, relatively stagnant need not stay so forever. It may be replaced by a more progressive substitute, or it may undergo an outburst of innovation previous thought very unlikely.” (Baumol et al. 1985, p.807).

The cure for the cost disease is that the stagnant, increasing-cost sectors need to undergo “an outburst of innovation”. But this raises the question; what has prevented this innovation from occurring thus far?

One thing that Baumol’s story ignores is public choice. Specifically, is the lack of labor-augmenting technology in the public-sector industries a characteristic of the public sector? The primary public sector industries have high rates of unionization and the primary goal of a labor union is to protect its dues-paying members. The chart below provides the union affiliation of workers for several occupations in 2013 and 2014.

union membership chart

In 2014, the protective service occupations and education, training, and library occupations, e.g. police officers and teachers, had relatively high union membership rates of 35%. Conversely, other high-skilled occupations such as management, computer and mathematical occupations, architecture and engineering occupations, and sales and office occupations had relatively low rates, ranging from 4.2% to 6.5% in 2014. Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations were in the middle at 14.6%, down from 16.1% in 2013.

The bottom part of the table shows the union membership rate of the public sector in general and of each level of government: federal, state, and local. The highest rate of unionization was at the local level, where approximately 42% of workers were members of a union in 2014, up from 41% in 2013. This is about 14 percentage points higher than the federal level and 12 percentage points higher than the state level. The union membership rate of the private sector in 2014 was only 6.6%.

In addition to the apathetic and sometimes hostile view unions have towards technological advancement and competition, union membership is also associated with higher wages, particularly at the local-government level. Economists Maury Gittleman and Brooks Piece of the Bureau of Labor statistics found that local-government workers have compensation costs 10 – 19% larger than similar private sector workers.

The table below shows the median weekly earnings in 2013 and 2014 for workers in the two most heavily unionized occupational categories; education, training, and library occupations and protective service occupations. In both occupation groups there is a substantial difference between the union and non-union weekly earnings. From the taxpayer’s perspective, higher earnings mean higher costs.

union median wage chart

There needs to be an incentive to expend resources in labor-saving technology for it to occur and it is not clear that this incentive exists in the public sector. In the public sector, taxpayers ultimately pay for the services they receive but these services are provided by an agent – the local politician(s) – who is expected to act on the taxpayer’s behalf when it comes to spending tax dollars. But in the public sector the agent/politician is accountable to both his employees and the general taxpayer since both groups vote on his performance. The general taxpayer wants the politician to cut costs and invest in labor-augmenting technology while the public-employee taxpayer wants to keep his job and earn more income. Since the public-employee unions are well organized compared to the general taxpayers it is easier for them to lobby their politicians/bosses in order to get their desired outcome, which ultimately means higher costs for the general taxpayer.

If Baumol’s cost disease is the primary factor responsible for the increasing cost of municipal government then there is not an easy remedy in the current environment. If the policing, firefighting, and education industries are unreceptive to labor-augmenting technology due to their high levels of unionization and near-monopoly status, one potential way to cure municipalities of the cost disease is privatization. In their 1996 paper, The Cost Disease and Government Growth: Qualifications to Baumol, economists J. Ferris and Edwin West state “Privatization could lead to significant changes in the structure of supply that result in “genuine” reductions in real costs” (p. 48).

Schools, police, and fire services are not true public goods and thus economic efficiency does not dictate that they are provided by a government entity. Schools in particular have been successfully built and operated by private funds for thousands of years. While there are fewer modern examples of privately operated police and fire departments, in theory both could be successfully privatized and historically fire departments were, though not always with great success. However, the failures of past private fire departments in places like New York City in the 19th century appear to be largely due to political corruption, an increase in political patronage, poorly designed incentives, and the failure of the rule of law rather than an inherent flaw in privatization. And today, many volunteer fire departments still exist. In 2013 69% of all firefighters were volunteers and 66% of all fire departments were all-volunteer.

The near-monopoly status of government provided education in many places and the actual monopoly of government provided police and fire protection makes these industries less susceptible to innovation. The government providers face little to no competition from private-sector alternatives, they are highly unionized and thus have little incentive to invest in labor-saving technology, and the importance of their output along with the aforementioned lack of competition allows them to pass cost increases on to taxpayers.

Market competition, limited union membership, and the profit-incentive are features of the private sector that are lacking in the public sector. Together these features encourage the use of labor-augmenting technology, which ultimately lowers costs and frees up resources, most notably labor, that can then be used on producing other goods and services. The higher productivity and lower costs that result from investments in productive capital also free up consumer dollars that can then be used to purchase additional goods and services from other industries.

Privatization of basic city services may be a little unnerving to some people, but ultimately it may be the only way to significantly bring down costs without cutting services. There are over 19,000 municipal governments in the US, which means there are over 19,000 groups of citizens that are capable of looking for new and innovative ways to provide the goods and services they rely on. In the private sector entrepreneurs continue to invent new things and find ways to make old things better and cheaper. I believe that if we allow entrepreneurs to apply their creativity to the public sector we will get similar outcomes.

Education, Innovation, and Urban Growth

One of the strongest predictors of urban growth since the start of the 20th century is the skill level of a city’s population. Cities that have a highly skilled population, usually measured as the share of the population with a bachelor’s degree or more, tend to grow faster than similar cities with less educated populations. This is true at both the metropolitan level and the city level. The figure below plots the population growth of 30 large U.S. cities from 1970 – 2013 on the vertical axis and the share of the city’s 25 and over population that had at least a bachelor’s degree in 1967 on the horizontal axis. (The education data for the cities are here. I am using the political city’s population growth and the share of the central city population with a bachelor’s degree or more from the census data linked to above.)

BA, city growth 1

As shown in the figure there is a strong, positive relationship between the two variables: The correlation coefficient is 0.61. It is well known that over the last 50 years cities in warmer areas have been growing while cities in colder areas have been shrinking, but in this sample the cities in warmer areas also tended to have a better educated population in 1967. Many of the cities known today for their highly educated populations, such as Seattle, San Francisco, and Washington D.C., also had highly educated populations in 1967. Colder manufacturing cities such as Detroit, Buffalo, and Newark had less educated workforces in 1967 and subsequently less population growth.

The above figure uses data on both warm and cold cities, but the relationship holds for only cold cities as well. Below is the same graph but only depicts cities that have a January mean temperature below 40°F. Twenty out of the 30 cities fit this criteria.

BA, city growth 2

Again, there is a strong, positive relationship. In fact it is even stronger; the correlation coefficient is 0.68. Most of the cities in the graph lost population from 1970 – 2013, but the cities that did grow, such as Columbus, Seattle, and Denver, all had relatively educated populations in 1967.

There are several reasons why an educated population and urban population growth are correlated. One is that a faster accumulation of skills and human capital spillovers in cities increase wages which attracts workers. Also, the large number of specialized employers located in cities makes it easier for workers, especially high-skill workers, to find employment. Cities are also home to a range of consumption amenities that attract educated people, such as a wide variety of shops, restaurants, museums, and sporting events.

Another reason why an educated workforce may actually cause city growth has to do with its ability to adjust and innovate. On average, educated workers tend to be more innovative and better able to learn new skills. When there is an negative, exogenous shock to an industry, such as the decline of the automobile industry or the steel industry, educated workers can learn new skills and create new industries to replace the old ones. Many of the mid-20th century workers in Detroit and other Midwestern cities decided to forego higher education because good paying factory jobs were plentiful. When manufacturing declined those workers had a difficult time learning new skills. Also, the large firms that dominated the economic landscape, such as Ford, did not support entrepreneurial thinking. This meant that even the educated workers were not prepared to create new businesses.

Local politicians often want to protect local firms in certain industries through favorable treatment and regulation. But often this protection harms newer, innovative firms since they are forced to compete with the older firms on an uneven playing field. Political favoritism fosters a stagnant economy since in the short-run established firms thrive at the expense of newer, more innovative startups. Famous political statements such as “What’s good for General Motors is good for the country” helped mislead workers into thinking that government was willing and able to protect their employers. But governments at all levels were unable to stop the economic forces that battered U.S. manufacturing.

To thrive in the 21st century local politicians need to foster economic environments that encourage innovation and ingenuity. The successful cities of the future will be those that are best able to innovate and to adapt in an increasingly complex world. History has shown us that an educated and entrepreneurial workforce is capable of overcoming economic challenges, but to do this people need to be free to innovate and create. Stringent land-use regulations, overly-burdensome occupational licensing, certificate-of-need laws, and other unnecessary regulations create barriers to innovation and make it more difficult for entrepreneurs to create the firms and industries of the future.

Grants to Puerto Rico haven’t helped much

Greece’s monetary and fiscal issues have overshadowed a similar situation right in America’s own back yard: Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico’s governor recently called the commonwealth’s $72 billion in debt “unpayable” and this has made Puerto Rico’s bondholders more nervous than they already were. Puerto Rico’s bonds were previously downgraded to junk by the credit rating agencies and there is a lot of uncertainty surrounding Puerto Rico’s ability to honor its obligations to both bond holders and its own workers, as the commonwealth’s pension system is drastically underfunded.   A major default would likely impact residents of the mainland U.S., since according to Morningstar most of the debt is owned by U.S. mutual funds, hedge funds, and mainland Americans.

So how did Puerto Rico get into this situation? Like many other places, including Greece and several U.S. cities, the government of Puerto Rico routinely spent more than it collected in revenue and then borrowed to fill the gap as shown in the graph below from Puerto Rico’s Office of Management and Budget. Over a recent 13 year period (2000 – 2012) Puerto Rico ran a deficit each year and accrued $23 billion in debt.

Puerto rico govt spending

Puerto Rico has a lot in common with many struggling cities in the U.S. that followed a similar fiscal path, such as a high unemployment rate of 12.4%, a shrinking labor force, stagnant or declining median household income, population flight, and falling house prices. Only 46.1% of the population 16 and over was in the labor force in 2012 (compared to an average of nearly 64% in the US in 2012) and the population declined by 4.8% from 2010 to 2014. It is difficult to raise enough revenue to fund basic government services when less than half the population is employed and the most able-bodied workers are leaving the country.

Like other U.S. cities and states, Puerto Rico receives intergovernmental grants from the federal government. As I have explained before, these grants reduce the incentives for a local government to get its fiscal house in order and misallocate resources from relatively responsible, growing areas to less responsible, shrinking areas. As an example, since 1975 Puerto Rico has received nearly $2.7 billion in Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico, has received over $900 million. The graph below shows the total amount of CDBGs awarded to the major cities of Puerto Rico from 1975 – 2014.

Total CDBGs Puerto Rico

As shown in the graph San Juan has received the bulk of the grant dollars. The graph below shows the amount by year for various years between 1980 and 2014 for San Juan and Puerto Rico as a whole plotted on the left vertical axis (bar graphs). On the right vertical axis is the amount of CDBG dollars per capita (line graphs). San Juan is in orange and Puerto Rico is in blue.

CDBGs per capita, yr Puerto Rico

San Juan has consistently received more dollars per capita than the other areas of Puerto Rico. Both total dollars and dollars per capita have been declining since 1980, which is when the CDBG program was near its peak funding level. As part of the 2009 Recovery Act, San Juan received an additional $2.8 million dollars and Puerto Rico as a country received another $5.9 million on top of the $32 million already provided by the program (not shown on the graph).

It’s hard to look at all of this redistribution and not consider whether it did any good. After all, $2.7 billion later Puerto Rico’s economy is struggling and their fiscal situation looks grim. Grant dollars from programs like the CDBG program consistently fail to make a lasting impact on the recipient’s economy. There are structural problems holding Puerto Rico’s economy back, such as the Jones Act, which increases the costs of goods on the island by restricting intra-U.S.-shipping to U.S. ships, and the enforcement of the U.S. minimum wage, which is a significant cost to employers in a place where the median wage is much lower than on the mainland. Intergovernmental grants and transfers do nothing to solve these underlying structural problems. But despite this reality, millions of dollars are spent every year with no lasting benefit.

More reasons why intergovernmental grants are harmful

In a recent blog post I explained how intergovernmental grants subsidize some businesses at the expense of others. But that is just one of several negative features of intergovernmental grants. They also make local governments less accountable for their fiscal decisions by allowing them to increase spending without increasing taxes. The Community Development Blog Grant (CDBG) money that local governments spend on city services or use to subsidize private businesses is provided by taxpayers from all over the country. Unlike locally raised money, when cities spend CDBG money they don’t have to first convince local voters to provide them with the funds. This lack of accountability often results in wasteful spending.

These grants also erode fiscal competition between cities and reduce the incentive to pursue policies that create economic growth. If local governments can receive funds for projects meant to bolster their tax base regardless of their fiscal policies, they have less of an incentive to create a fiscal environment that is conducive to economic growth. The feedback loop between growth promoting policies and actual economic growth is impaired when revenue can be generated independently of such policies e.g. by successfully applying for intergovernmental grants.

Some of the largest recipients of CDBG money are cities that have been declining since the 1950s. The graph below shows the total amount of CDBG dollars given to nine cities that were in the top 15 of the largest cities in the US by population in 1950. (Click on graphs to enlarge. Data used in the graphs are here.)

CDBGs 9 cities 1950

None of these cities were in the top 15 cities in 2014 and most of them have lost a substantial amount of people since 1950. In Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, and Buffalo the CDBG money has not reversed or even slowed their decline and yet the federal government continues to give these cities millions of dollars each year. The purpose of these grants is to create sustainable economic development in the recipient cities but it is difficult to argue that such development has occurred.

Contrast the amount of money given to the cities above with that of the cities below:

CDBGs 9 cities 2014

By 2014 the nine cities in the second graph had replaced the other cities in the top 15 largest US cities by population. Out of the nine cities in the second graph only one, San Antonio, has received $1 billion or more in CDBG funds. In comparison, every city in the first graph has received at least that much.

While there are a lot of factors that contribute to the decline of some cities and the rise of others (such as the general movement of the population towards warmer weather), these graphs are evidence that the CDBG program is incapable of saving Detroit, Buffalo, St. Louis, Cleveland, etc. from population and economic decline. Detroit alone has received nearly $3 billion in CDBG grants over the last 40 years yet still had to declare bankruptcy in 2013. St. Louis, Cleveland, Baltimore, Buffalo, and Milwaukee are other examples of cities that have received a relatively large amount of CDBG funding yet are still struggling with population decline and budget issues. Place-based, redistributive policies like the CDBG program misallocate resources from growing cities to declining cities and reduce the incentive for local governments to implement policies that encourage economic growth.

Moreover, if place-based subsidies, such as the CDBG program, do create some temporary local economic growth, there is evidence that this growth is merely shifted from other areas. In a study on the Tennessee Valley Authority, perhaps the most ambitious place-based program in the country’s history, economists Patrick Kline and Enrico Moretti (2014) found that the economic gains that accrued to the area covered by the TVA were completely offset by losses in other parts of the country. As they state, “Thus, we estimate that the spillovers in the TVA region were fully offset by the losses in the rest of the country…Notably, this finding casts doubt on the traditional big push rationale for spatially progressive subsidies.” This study is further evidence for what other economists have been saying for a long time: Subsidized economic growth in one area, if it occurs, comes at the expense of growth in other areas and does not grow the US economy as a whole.