Tag Archives: First Job

Ignoring the adverse effects of the minimum wage may cost taxpayers billions

Today the Obama administration issued a statement calling for a ‘First Job’ funding initiative to connect young Americans with jobs.

The statement laments how difficult it is for young people to find employment and emphasizes how important a first jobs is for future career success:

“After the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, the United States is in the midst of the longest streak of private-sector job growth in our history, with more than 14 million new jobs created during the past 70 months. But for too many young people, getting a first job—a crucial step in starting their career—is challenging.

When a young person struggles to get their first job, it can have a lasting negative impact on her lifetime income as well as her motivation, pride, and self-esteem.”  

I brought up this same issue 3 months ago in a previous blog post that highlighted the differences in teenage unemployment across cities. And unsurprisingly there are substantial differences – in 2012 teenage unemployment was over 45% in Atlanta and only about 26% in Houston.

So what’s the proposal? A $5.5 BILLION grab bag of grants, skills investment, and direct wage payments to put young people to work. Naturally, the most obvious solution to the teenage unemployment problem is never mentioned – eliminating the minimum wage. In fact, nowhere is it hinted at that the minimum wage may be contributing to teenage unemployment, despite several recent studies affirming this theory.

From a 2013 study:

“Thus, for older workers, the two effects offset one another, and there is little impact on their long-term employment rate. For teenagers, the extra reduction in hiring implies that their employment rates decline. The results are very similar for males and females.”

From a 2015 study:

Using three separate state panels of administrative employment data, we find that the minimum wage reduces job growth over a period of several years”

From a 2015 study:

We find that a higher minimum wage level is associated with higher earnings, lower employment and reduced worker turnover for those in the 14–18 age group. “ (My bold)

From a 2015 study:

I apply the estimator to estimate the impact of the minimum wage on the employment rate of teenagers. I estimate an elasticity of -0.10 and reject the null hypothesis that there is no effect.”

This glaring omission is unconscionable in light of the abundant evidence that the minimum wage harms the least skilled, least experienced workers, which includes teenagers.

As a Prof. David Neumark stated in a recent WSJ op-ed:

“…let’s not pretend that a higher minimum wage doesn’t come with costs, and let’s not ignore that some of the low-skill workers the policy is intended to help will bear some of these costs.”

An all too common occurrence in US policy is that government intervention causes a problem that the government then tries to solve with additional intervention, completely ignoring the possibility that the initial intervention was the source of the problem. In this case, price controls at the bottom of the labor-market ladder have prevented young people from getting on the first rung, so now the government wants to wheel over a $5.5 billion dollar stool to give them a boost.

While this series of imprudent events is not surprising, it’s still frustrating.