Tag Archives: George Mason University

Graduate School Opportunities Available Through Mercatus

One of the great parts of working at Mercatus is getting to interact with all of the bright and ambitious students that participate in our academic programs. Mercatus offers four unique graduate programs for students interested in political economy and public policy. The training and education that Mercatus provides are one of a kind.

As part of each program students get access to funding, practical experience, and a wide network of passionate, dedicated scholars. Many graduates from each program go on to develop successful careers in academia and public policy. Ninety-two percent of MA Fellowship graduates, for example, receive a job within 9 months of graduation. Whether you’re pursuing a Master’s, PhD, or law degree, there may be something for you at Mercatus.

The four programs and their details are below.  If you’re interested in learning more and applying, check out our website. Deadlines are right around the corner, with the PhD Fellowship deadline approaching at the end of this week.

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Mercatus PhD Fellowship

The PhD Fellowship is a competitive, full-time fellowship program for students pursuing a doctoral degree in economics at George Mason University. PhD Fellows take courses in market process economics, public choice, and institutional analysis and work on projects that use these lenses to understand global prosperity and change.

Students receive an award up to $200,000 (over five years) for full tuition support and a monthly stipend, as well as experience as a research assistant working closely with Mercatus-affiliated Mason faculty. The application deadline is February 1, 2018.

Mercatus MA Fellowship

The MA Fellowship is a tw0-year, competitive, full-time fellowship program for students pursuing a master’s degree in economics at George Mason University in preparation for a career in public policy. Fellows attend readings groups and career development workshops, spend at least 20 hours per week working with Mercatus scholars and staff, and complete a Mercatus Graduate Policy essay.

Students receive an award of up to $80,000 (over two years) for full tuition support and a monthly stipend, as well as practical experience conducting and disseminating research with Mercatus scholars and staff on pertinent policy issues. The application deadline is March 1, 2018.

Mercatus Adam Smith Fellowship

The Adam Smith Fellowship is a one-year, competitive fellowship program for PhD students at any university and in any discipline. The goal of this fellowship is to introduce students to a framework of ideas they may not otherwise encounter in their studies. Fellows meet a few times out of the year to engage in discussions on key foundational texts in the Austrian, Virginia, and Bloomington schools of political economy and learn how these texts may apply to their research interests.

Students receive a stipend up to $10,000 as well as travel, lodging, and all materials to attend workshops and seminars hosted by the Mercatus Center. The application deadline is March 15, 2018.

Mercatus Frédéric Bastiat Fellowship

The Frédéric Bastiat Fellowship is a one-year, competitive fellowship program for graduate students attending master’s, juris doctoral, and doctoral programs in a variety of disciplines. The goal of this fellowship is to introduce students to the Austrian, Virginia, and Bloomington school of political economy as academic foundations for pursuing contemporary policy analysis. Fellows meet a few times out of the year to engage in discussions on key foundational texts and interact with scholars that work on the cutting edge of policy analysis.

Students receive a stipend of up to $5,000 as well as travel, lodging, and all materials to attend workshops and seminars hosted by the Mercatus Center. The application deadline is March 15, 2018.

 

 

Pokémon Go Represents the Best of Capitalism

An article uploaded to Vox.com by Timothy Lee earlier this week, “Pokémon Go is everything that is wrong with late capitalism,”has caused quite a stir, since it was fairly critical of the “Pokémon Go economy.” Given the popularity of the game though (and our concern that some players would be alarmed that their lighthearted entertainment was somehow destroying the economy) we wanted to offer a different perspective to some of the points made in the article.

In fact, we think that Pokémon Go actually represents the best of capitalism. In less than a week the game has topped 15 million downloads and the 21 million active daily users spend an average of 33 minutes a day playing. That amounts to over 11.5 million hours of playing per day, and those numbers only look to increase. The app doesn’t cost anything to download and play, which means that Nintendo and Niantic (the game developer) are essentially giving away tens of millions of dollars of value to the eager players.

We know that’s a bold statement. But this is why it’s true: A person’s time is scarce and valuable. Every moment they spend playing Pokémon Go they could instead be doing something else. The fact that they’re voluntarily choosing to play means that the benefit of playing is more than the cost.

Economists call this “consumer surplus” – the difference between a customer’s willingness to pay for a good or service and the price that it actually costs. It’s a measurement of the dollar value gained by the consumer in the exchange. If a person was to buy a game of bowling for $5 that they value at $7, instead of playing an hour of Pokémon that they value at $3 for free, that person would lose out on value that would have made their life better.

So even if the average consumer surplus is only a measly dollar an hour, consumers are getting $11.5 million dollars of value each day. The fact that customers are buying special items to use in the game, spending upwards of $1.6 million each day, implies that the value players receive from the game is actually higher.

The article laments that local economies are harmed because people are turning toward forms of entertainment that don’t have high production costs, like movie theaters or bowling alleys that need expensive buildings or numerous employees selling buckets of popcorn. What the article misses is that the economic activity associated with traditional entertainment options represent the costs of providing the entertainment. The reality we have now is much better, since we not only gain the value of the entertainment, but we have the money we would have paid for it to purchase other things as well. It’s almost like getting something for nothing, and our lives – and the economy in general – are better as result.

This is the core of economic growth – decreasing the scarcity of goods and services that limits our lives. The article makes it seem as if economic growth comes from simply spending money. This view can lead us astray because it ignores the importance of entrepreneurs, whose role is critical in the creation of new products and services that improve everyone’s well-being.

Pokémon Go is actually a great example of this. The game developers and their investors thought that they could make something that customers might like and they took the entrepreneurial risk to create the game without the certainty that it was going to be a success. Obviously, it was a good gamble, but I’m sure that even they are amazed at the results. Imagine if the game development funds had been used to build a couple of bowling alleys instead. Wow. What fun.

Think of what would have been lost to society if entrepreneurs didn’t have the funds and the freedom to take that gamble. And their success has spawned a sub-industry of “Poképreneurs” who are selling drinks and providing rides to Pokémon players. Economic growth – and our increased social well-being – depends on this kind of permissionless innovation.

In short, Pokémon Go represents the very best of capitalism because it’s premised on voluntary exchange – no one is forced to download the game, players can stop playing at any time they like, and if they value the special items available in the game store they can buy them to enhance their fun. Furthermore, the entrepreneurs who had the foresight and the guts to dare to make the world a better place are being rewarded for their accomplishment. Most importantly, that success only comes about because they have made people’s lives better in the process. That’s something Team Rocket could never learn to do.

About the Authors:

Michael Farren is a Research Fellow in the Study of American Capitalism at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He’s a proud member of Team Instinct, because he likes a challenge.

Adam A. Millsap is a Research Fellow in the State and Local Policy Project at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. No team will allow him to join, because all he can catch is Pidgeys.

*The title and opening sentence of this article has changed since it was originally published.

Three ways states can improve their health care markets

I have a new essay, coauthored with two of my former students, Anna Mills and Dana Williams. We just published a piece in Real Clear Policy summarizing it. Here is a selection of the OpEd:

Liberals, conservative, and libertarians agree on the goals: Patients should have access to innovative, low-cost, and high-quality care. And though another round of federal reform may be years off, a number of state-level changes can move us closer to a competitive and patient-centered health-care market, making it possible to realize these shared aspirations.

In a new paper published by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, we identify three areas for reform: States can eliminate certificate-of-need laws, liberalize scope-of-practice regulations, and end the regulatory barriers to telemedicine.

And here is our longer essay.

Is American Federalism conducive to liberty?

In new Mercatus research, Dr. Richard E. Wagner, Harris professor of Economics at George Mason University tackles a fascinating question: Is the American form of federalism supportive of liberty?

His answer is a qualified ‘yes.’ Under certain conditions, American federalism does support liberty, but that very same system can also be modified resulting in the expansion of political power relative to the liberty of citizens. The question of what results from the gradual constitutional transformation of the American federalist system is a salient one for not only students of government but also policymakers.

The important conditions that determine which form of federalism prevails (liberty-supporting or liberty-eroding) are rooted in competition among governments. Today we are experiencing a very different kind of federalism than the one instituted by the Founders. For the better part of a century, the US constitution has often been amended in a way to encourage collusion among the states thus undermining a key feature of a liberty-supporting federalism.

Restoring a liberty-supporting federalism first requires a deeper diagnosis of the American federalist system. Dr. Wagner develops that possibility through a very engaging synthesis of public choice theory, Austrian and new institutional economics.  Student of Dr. Wagner may be familiar with many of these concepts, developed in his public finance books including Deficits, Debt and Democracy (2012, Elgar). Rather than summarize the paper in today’s blog post, for now I encourage you to read the piece in full.

Come Study at George Mason University

It is hard to believe but it’s been about 15 years since I attended my first Institute for Humane Studies weekend seminar at Claremont McKenna College. I can still remember the challenging conversations and stimulating lectures, especially those by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel and Lydia Ortega, both of San Jose State.

The most exciting idea I walked away from that weekend with was this: it’s possible to make a career out of advancing liberty.

From I.H.S. I learned about George Mason University. After doing quite a bit of research and attending a Public Choice Outreach Conference at GMU, I became convinced that the best thing I could do to set myself on the path of a career exploring the ideas of liberty was to get a graduate degree in economics from GMU. I eventually got my doctorate at GMU and now I have the best job in the world at the Mercatus Center.

George Mason University School of Public Policy 3351 Fairfax Drive Arlington (VA) 2013If you, too, have ever thought about such a career, now is the time to act on it. Here are a few opportunities:

The PhD Fellowship is a three-year, competitive, full-time fellowship program for students who are pursuing a doctoral degree in economics at George Mason University. It includes full tuition support, a stipend, and experience as a research assistant working closely with Mercatus-affiliated Mason faculty. It is a total award of up to $120,000 over three years. The application deadline is February 1, 2014.

The MA Fellowship is a two-year, competitive, full-time fellowship program for students pursuing a master’s degree in economics at George Mason University and interested in gaining advanced training in applied economics in preparation for a career in public policy. It includes full tuition support, a stipend, and practical experience as a research assistant working with Mercatus scholars. It is a total award of up to $80,000 over two years. The application deadline is March 1, 2014.

The Adam Smith Fellowship is a one-year, competitive fellowship for graduate students attending PhD programs at any university, in a variety of fields, including economics, philosophy, political science, and sociology. Smith Fellows receive a stipend and attend workshops and seminars on the Austrian, Virginia, and Bloomington schools of political economy. It is a total award of up to $10,000 for the year. The application deadline is March 15, 2014.

New resource: Mercatus Center’s 2013 State and Local Policy Guide

Are you interested in the practical policy applications of the kinds of research the State and Local Policy Project is producing?

For an accessible and very useful review have a look at the inaugural edition of the Mercatus Center’s 2013 State and Local Policy Guide produced by our Outreach Team.

The guide is divided into six sections outlining how to control spending, fix broken pensions systems, control healthcare cost, streamline government, evaluate regulations, and develop competitive tax policies. Each section gives an overview of our research and makes brief, specific, and practical policy proposals.

If you have any questions, please contact Michael Leland, Associate Director of State Outreach, mleland@mercatus.gmu.edu

Apply for the Mercatus MA Fellowship

One of the more rewarding aspects of my job is the opportunity it affords me to work alongside dozens of bright, ambitious, Mercatus MA Fellows. The Mercatus MA Fellowship is a competitive, full-time fellowship program for students pursuing a master’s degree in economics at George Mason University. It is ideal for those interested in pursuing a career in public policy rather than academia (for those interested in the academic route, the Ph.D. Fellowship may be for you). The MA Fellowship includes full tuition support, a stipend, and a research assistantship position with Mercatus scholars. It is a total award of up to $80,000 over two years.

Successful MA Fellows—including my co-blogger and MA Fellowship alumna, Emily Washington—have gone on to do great things. Some have secured public policy positions in federal and state government; others work at prominent research institutions. If you are interested, you better hurry. The application deadline for Fall 2013 is March 1, 2013. Apply here.

Abolish Government Favoritism

I was on vacation last week, so I am a little behind on blogging. Before I left, the New York Times’s Adam Davidson ran an interesting article on F.A. Hayek, calling him Paul Ryan’s “guru.” In the piece, Davidson quotes my Mercatus and GMU colleague, Pete Boettke:

In actuality, Ryan is like a lot of politicians who merely cherry-pick Hayek to promote neoclassical policies, says Peter Boettke, an economist at George Mason University and editor of The Review of Austrian Economics. “What Hayek has become, to a lot of people, is an iconic figure representing something that he didn’t believe at all,” Boettke says. For example, despite his complete lack of faith in the ability of politicians to affect the economy, Hayek, who is frequently cited in attacks on entitlement programs, believed that the state should provide a base income to all poor citizens.

To be truly Hayekian, Boettke says, Ryan would need to embrace one of his central ideas, known as the “generality norm.” This is Hayek’s belief that any government program that helps one group must be available to all. If applied, Boettke says, a Hayekian government would eliminate all corporate and agricultural subsidies and government housing programs, and it would get rid of Medicare and Medicaid or expand them to cover all citizens. (Hayek had no problem with a national health care program.) Hayek also believed that the government should not have a monopoly on any service it provides; instead, private companies should compete by offering an alternative Postal Service, road system, even, perhaps, a private fire department.

I’m glad Pete picked up on this. In my view, Hayek’s generality norm is the polar opposite of the Pathology of Privilege. And as I have argued in the past, the abolition of favoritism in government policy has both economic and moral appeal. This appeal, moreover, seems likely to cut across the ideological divide.

Taxing People to Advocate for Taxing People

Back in April I blogged on a CDC program that seemed to be using taxpayer dollars to fund lobbying for more taxes. In his column this week, George Will picks up on the same program and offers a few more details. Here is a snippet:

In Cook County, Ill., according to an official report, recipients using some of a $16 million CDC grant “educated policymakers on link between SSBs [sugar-sweetened beverages] and obesity, economic impact of an SSB tax, and importance of investing revenue into prevention.”

Along the way, Will also highlights some excellent work coauthored by my colleague Sherzod Abdukadirov. Leaving legality aside, Will asks, “is such “nutrition activism” effective?”

Not according to Michael L. Marlow, economics professor at California Polytechnic State University, and Sherzod Abdukadirov of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Writing in Regulation (“Can Behavioral Economics Combat Obesity?”), a quarterly publication of the libertarian Cato Institute, they powerfully question the assumptions underlying paternalistic policies such as using taxes to nudge individuals to make consumption choices that serve their real but unrecognized interests — e.g., drinking fewer SSBs.