Tag Archives: Illinois House

Don’t Bailout the States

Last week the Illinois House adopted HR 0720 which was part of a growing effort to remove the possibility of a federal bailout for the states. The synopsis of the House Resolution reads:

Urges the federal government to take no action to redeem, assume, or guarantee State debt; and the Secretary of the Treasury should report to Congress negotiations to engage in actions that would result in an outlay of Federal funds on behalf of creditors to a State.

Senior Director of Government Affairs at the Illinois Policy Institute, Collin Hitt, offered committee testimony on the resolution. While writing about his testimony, Collin correctly argues that

Illinois’ problems are its own. Illinois has the tools to fix its finances. The state is seeing record reviews. Pension reform and Medicaid reform are possible, and there are concrete ideas to fix these debt-ridden programs. The prospect of a federal bailout only forestalls those solutions. If a federal bailout is considered imminent – or even possible – then the urgency to actually solve our problems ourselves is diminished. This resolution sends a message throughout state government that a bailout is not a solution that the State of Illinois can plan on.

That last part is absolutely essential, as it gets at a serious issue currently taking place in Illinois and other troubled states across the U.S. When politicians and law makers are dealing with a state that is on the brink of fiscal collapse they have two options: 1) make lasting intuitional and structural reform or 2) avoid significant reform and hope that most of the issues fix themselves. As a federal bailout becomes more likely, however, avoiding reform becomes politically easier. This, therefore, becomes a race to the bottom scenario where the states that end up in the worst fiscal shape are “rewarded” with a federal bailout… A very bad incentive structure and a scary road to head down.

Hopefully HR 0720 gains more traction and Illinois and begins to change the growing federal bailout expectations. If it is successful, other states should surely follow.