Tag Archives: Larry Summers

Women are driving recent increase in age 25-54 labor force participation

Josh Zumbrun from the WSJ posted some interesting labor market charts that use data from today’s September jobs report. The one that jumped out at me was the one below, which shows the prime-age (age 25-54) employment and labor force participation (LFP) rate.

wsj-prime-age-sept-16-prime-age-lfp

In a related tweet he notes that the 25 – 54 LFP rate is up nearly 1 percentage point in the last year. The exact number is 0.9 from Sept. 2015 to Sept. 2016, and in the figure above you can clearly see an increase in the blue line at the end. So does this mean we are finally seeing a recovery in the prime age LFP rate? Yes and no.

I dug a little deeper and females appear to be driving most of the trend. The figure below shows the prime age male and female LFP rates from Jan. 2006 to the Sept. 2016. (Female data series LNS11300062 and male series LNS11300061)

oct-female-male-lfp-rate-1-06-9-16

As shown in the figure, the female LFP rate (orange line) appears to be steadily increasing since September of last year while the male LFP rate (blue line) is flatter. To get a better look, the following figure zooms in on the period January 2015 to September 2016 and adds a linear trend line.

oct-male-female-lfp-rate-1-15-9-16

The female LFP rate does appear to be trending up since the beginning of last year, but the male line is essentially flat.

Much has been made about the short-term and long-term decline of the prime-age male LFP rate. President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors wrote an entire report about it, and economists such as Larry Summers have recently said that figuring out why males are dropping out of the labor force and what to do about it is “vital to our future”.

The recent uptick in the overall prime-age LFP rate is a good sign, but it appears to be largely driven by women. I think it’s still too early to say that the LFP rate of prime-age men has started to improve, and what this means for the future is still unknown.

Puerto Rico’s labor market woes

Puerto Rico – a U.S. territory – has $72 billion dollars in outstanding debt, which is dangerously high in a country with a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of only $103.1 billion. The Puerto Rican government failed to pay creditors in August and this was viewed as a default by the credit rating agency Moody’s, which had already downgraded Puerto Rico’s bonds to junk status earlier this year. The Obama administration has proposed allowing Puerto Rico to declare bankruptcy, which would allow it to negotiate with creditors and eliminate some of its debt. Currently only municipalities – not states or territories – are allowed to declare bankruptcy under U.S. law. Several former Obama administration officials have come out in favor of the plan, including former Budget Director Peter Orszag and former Director of the National Economic Council Larry Summers. Others are warning that bankruptcy is not a cure-all and that more structural reforms need to take place. Many of these pundits have pointed out that Puerto Rico’s labor market is a mess and that people are leaving the country in droves. Since 2010 over 200,000 people have migrated from Puerto Rico, decreasing its population to just over 3.5 million. This steady loss of the tax base has increased the debt burden on those remaining and has made it harder for Puerto Rico to get out of debt.

To get a sense of Puerto Rico’s situation, the figure below shows the poverty rate of Puerto Rico along with that of three US states that will be used throughout this post as a means of comparison: California (wealthy state), Ohio (medium-wealth state), and Mississippi (low-wealth state). All the data are 1-year ACS data from American FactFinder.

puerto rico poverty

The poverty rate in Puerto Rico is very high compared to these states. Mississippi’s poverty rate is high by US standards and was approximately 22% in 2014, but Puerto Rico’s dwarfed it at over 45%. Assisting Puerto Rico with their immediate debt problem will do little to fix this issue.

A government requires taxes in order to provide services, and taxes are primarily collected from people who work in the regular economy via income taxes. A small labor force with relatively few employed workers makes it difficult for a county to raises taxes to provide services and pay off debt. Puerto Rico has a very low labor force participation (LFP) rate relative to mainland US states and a very low employment rate. The graphs below plot Puerto Rico’s LFP rate and employment rate along with the rates of California, Mississippi, and Ohio.

puerto rico labor force

puerto rico employ rate

As shown in the figures, Puerto Rico’s employment rate and LFP rate are far below the rates of the US states including one of the poorest states, Mississippi. In 2014 less than 45% of Puerto Rico’s 16 and over population was in the labor force and only about 35% of the 16 and over population was employed. In Mississippi the LFP rate was 58% while the employment rate was 52%. Additionally, the employment rate fell in Puerto Rico from 2010-14 while it rose in each of the other three states. So at a time when the labor market was improving on the mainland things were getting worse in Puerto Rico.

An educated labor force is an important input in the production process and it is especially important for generating innovation and entrepreneurship. The figure below shows the percent of people 25 and over in each area that have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

puerto rico gt 24 education attain

Puerto Rico has a relatively educated labor force compared to Mississippi, though it trails Ohio and California. The percentage also increased over this time period, though it appears to have stabilized after 2012 while continuing to grow in the other states.

Puerto Rico has nice beaches and weather, so a high percentage of educated people over the age of 25 may simply be due to a high percentage of educated retirees residing in Puerto Rico to take advantage of its geographic amenities. The next figure shows the percentage of 25 to 44 year olds with a bachelor’s degree or higher. I examined this age group to see if the somewhat surprising percentage of people with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Puerto Rico is being driven by educated older workers and retirees who are less likely to help reinvigorate the Puerto Rican economy going forward.

puerto rico 25to44 educ attain

As shown in the graph, Puerto Rico actually fares better when looking at the 25 – 44 age group, especially from 2010-12. In 2012 Puerto Rico had a higher percentage of educated people in this age group than Ohio.

Since then, however, Puerto Rico’s percentage declined slightly while Ohio’s rose, along with Mississippi’s and California’s. The decline in Puerto Rico was driven by a decline in the percentage of people 35 to 44 with a bachelor’s or higher as shown in the next figure below.

puerto rico 35to44 educ attain

The percentage of 35 to 44 year olds with a bachelor’s or advanced degree fell from 32% in 2012 to 29.4% in 2014 while it rose in the other three states. This is evidence that educated people in their prime earning years left the territory during this period, most likely to work in the US where there are more opportunities and wages are higher. This “bright flight” is a bad sign for Puerto Rico’s economy.

One of the reforms that many believe will help Puerto Rico is an exemption from compliance with federal minimum wage laws. Workers in Puerto Rico are far less productive than in the US, and thus a $7.25 minimum wage has a large effect on employment. Businesses cannot afford to pay low-skill workers in Puerto Rico such a high wage because the workers simply do not produce enough value to justify it. The graph below shows the median individual yearly income in each area divided by the full time federal minimum wage income of $15,080.

puerto rico min wage ratio

As shown in the graph, Puerto Rico’s ratio was the highest by a substantial amount. The yearly income from earning the minimum wage was about 80% of the yearly median income in Puerto Rico over this period, while it was only about 40% in Mississippi and less in Ohio and California. By this measure, California’s minimum wage would need to be $23.82 – which is equal to $49,546 per year – to equal the ratio in Puerto Rico. California’s actual minimum wage is $9 and it’s scheduled to increase to $10 in 2016. I don’t think there’s a single economist who would argue that more than doubling the minimum wage in California would have no effect on employment.

The preceding figures do not paint a rosy picture of Puerto Rico: Its poverty rate is high and trending up, less than half of the people over 16 are in the labor force and only about a third are actually employed, educated people appear to be leaving the country, and the minimum wage is a severe hindrance on hiring. Any effort by the federal government to help Puerto Rico needs to take these problems into account. Ultimately the Puerto Rican government needs to be enabled and encouraged to institute reforms that will help grow Puerto Rico’s economy. Without fundamental reforms that increase economic opportunity in Puerto Rico people will continue to leave, further weakening the commonwealth’s economy and making additional defaults more likely.

 

 

Government shouldn’t pick winners either

Last week, Steven Mufson of the Washington Post reported:

The Energy Department gave $150 million in economic Recovery Act funds to a battery company, LG Chem Michigan, which has yet to manufacture cells used in any vehicles sold to the public and whose workers passed time watching movies, playing board, card and video games, or volunteering for animal shelters and community groups.

This week, Mufson’s colleague Thomas Heath reports about another firm that has received gov’t aide:

District-based daily-deal company LivingSocial has received a much-needed $110 million cash infusion from its investors, according to a memo the company sent to employees Wednesday.

“This investment is a tremendous vote of confidence in our business from the people who know us best, our current board members and investors,” LivingSocial chief executive Tim O’Shaughnessy said in the memo, which was obtained by The Washington Post.

Mr. O’Shaughnessy is putting a nice gloss on it. A LivingSocial “senior company insider” tells PrivCo:

We scrambled for cash quickly….we did receive one other funding offer, but the current investors’ terms were the least bad of two terrible proposals….which we had no choice but to take it or file for Chapter 11.

According to PrivCo, the company ended the year with just $76 million in cash and assets while it faces some $338 million in liabilities.

Readers will no doubt remember that just eight months ago, the D.C. Council unanimously voted to give LivingSocial a $32,500,000 get-out-of-tax-free card.

These stories (and the many, many more that could be told) suggest that President Obama’s former economic adviser  Larry Summers, was right to warn that government is a crappy venture capitalist. Milton and Rose Friedman’s simple explanation of the four ways money can be spent offers a nice explanation:

how to spend money

A private venture capitalist spends her own money to buy equity in a firm. And if that firm does well, she does well. Since she is spending her own money on herself, she has an incentive to both economize and seek the highest value.

But when government policymakers play venture capitalist, they are spending other peoples’ money on other people. They therefore have little incentive to either economize or seek high value. It is no wonder that they often make the wrong bets.

But the scandal has much more to do with a bad bet. Even if the bet pays off—which it sometimes does—there are problems associated with taxpayer support of private industry. There are more details in my paper, but just to name a few, government-supported industries will tend to:

  • Be cartelized, which means consumers are stuck with higher prices;
  • Use less-efficient productive techniques;
  • Offer lower-quality goods;
  • Waste resources in an effort to expand or maintain their government-granted privileges;
  • Innovate along the wrong margins by coming up with new ways to obtain favors rather than new ways to please customers.

Together, these costs can undermine long term growth and even short-term macroeconomic stability. And since the winners tend to be the wealthy and well-connected and the losers tend to be the relatively poor and unknown, privileges such as these undermine people’s faith in both government and markets.

We should be upset when governments sink money into firms that then go bankrupt. But it is no less scandalous when government sinks funds into firms that survive.

Governments should stay out of the business of picking winners or losers.