Tag Archives: North Dakota

More labor market freedom means more labor force participation

The U.S. labor force participation (LFP) rate has yet to bounce back to its pre-recession level. Some of the decline is due to retiring baby-boomers but even the prime-age LFP rate, which only counts people age 25 – 54 and thus less affected by retirement, has not recovered.

Economists and government officials are concerned about the weak recovery in labor force participation. A high LFP rate is usually a sign of a strong economy—people are either working or optimistic about their chances of finding a job. A low LFP rate is often a sign of little economic opportunity or disappointment with the employment options available.

The U.S. is a large, diverse country so the national LFP rate obscures substantial state variation in LFP rates. The figure below shows the age 16 and up LFP rates for the 50 states and the U.S. as a whole (black bar) in 2014. (data)

2014-state-lfp-rates

The rates range from a high of 72.6% in North Dakota to a low of 53.1% in West Virginia. The U.S. rate was 62.9%. Several of the states with relatively low rates are in the south, including Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas. Florida and Arizona also had relatively low labor force participation, which is not surprising considering their reputations as retirement destinations.

There are several reasons why some states have more labor force participation than others. Demographics is one: states with a higher percentage of people over age 65 and between 16 and 22 will have lower rates on average since people in these age groups are often retired or in school full time. States also have different economies made up of different industries and at any given time some industries are thriving while others are struggling.

Federal and state regulation also play a role. Federal regulation disparately impacts different states because of the different industrial compositions of state economies. For example, states with large energy industries tend to be more affected by federal regulation than other states.

States also tax and regulate their labor markets differently. States have different occupational licensing standards, different minimum wages and different levels of payroll and income taxes among other things. Each of these things alters the incentive for businesses to hire or for people to join the labor market and thus affects states’ LFP rates.

We can see the relationship between labor market freedom and labor force participation in the figure below. The figure shows the relationship between the Economic Freedom of North America’s 2013 labor market freedom score (x-axis) and the 2014 labor force participation rate for each state (y-axis).

lab-mkt-freed-and-lfp-rate

As shown in the figure there is a positive relationship—more labor market freedom is associated with a higher LFP rate on average. States with lower freedom scores such as Mississippi, Kentucky and Alabama also had low LFP rates while states with higher freedom scores such as North Dakota, South Dakota and Virginia had higher LFP rates.

This is not an all-else-equal analysis and other variables—such as demographics and industry composition which I mentioned earlier—also play a role. That being said, state officials concerned about their state’s labor market should think about what they can do to increase labor market freedom—and economic freedom more broadly—in their state.

Third Edition of Freedom in the 50 States

Today the Mercatus Center released the third edition of Freedom in the 50 States by Will Ruger and Jason Sorens. In this new edition, the authors score states on over 200 policy variables. Additionally, they have collected data from 2001 to measure how states’ freedom rankings have changed over the past decade. While several organizations publish state freedom rankingsFreedom in the 50 States is the only one that measures both economic and personal freedoms.

Ruger and Sorens have implemented a new methodology for measuring freedom. While previously the authors developed a subjective weighting system in which they sought to determine how significantly policies limited the freedom of how many people, in this edition they have use a victim-cost method, assigning a dollar value to each variable that restricts freedom measuring the cost of restricting freedom for potential victims. The authors’ cost calculations are designed to measure the value of the states’ freedom for the average resident. Since individuals measure the cost of policies differently, readers can put their own price on each freedom variable on the website to find the states that best match their subjective policy preference.

In addition to an overall freedom ranking, Freedom in the 50 States includes a breakdown of states’ Fiscal Policy Ranking, Regulatory Ranking, and Personal Freedom Ranking. On the overall freedom ranking, North Dakota comes in first followed by South Dakota, Tennessee, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma.  At the bottom of the ranking, New York ranks worst by a significant margin, with rent control and burdensome insurance regulations dragging down its regulatory freedom score. New York is behind California at 49th, then New Jersey, Hawaii, and Rhode Island.

The authors note that residents respond to the costs of freedom-reducing policies by voting with their feet. Between 2000 and 2011, New York lost 9% of its population to out-migration. In addition to all types of freedom being associated with domestic migration, the authors find that regulatory freedom in particular is associated with states’ growth in personal income. They conclude:

Freedom is not the only determinant of personal satisfaction and fulfillment, but as our analysis of migration patterns shows, it makes a tangible difference for people’s decisions about where to live. Moreover, we fully expect people in the freer states to develop and benefit from the kinds of institutions (such as symphonies and museums) and amenities (such as better restaurants and cultural attractions) seen in some of the older cities on the coasts.

[…]

These things take time, but the same kind of dynamic freedom enjoyed in Chicago or New York in the 19th century — that led to their rise — might propel places in the middle of the country to be a bit more hip to those with urbane tastes.

State Revenue Uncertainty

Yesterday the National Conference of State Legislatures released its State Budget Update for 2012, projecting that states’ revenues are approaching levels not seen since before the recession. This means that the budget deficits that have been common in most states over the past few years will hopefully be rare this fiscal year. As Reuters reports:

The situation is now turning around. Only California and the state of Washington currently are projecting deficits for fiscal 2012, according to NCSL. At the same time, resource-rich states like Alaska, Wyoming and North Dakota expect big balances for fiscal 2012, which ended on June 30 for most states.

For fiscal 2013, none of the states are projecting deficits, with 10 states and Washington, D.C., eyeing balances equal to 10 percent or more of general fund spending, the NCSL reported. However, year-end balances of just 0.1 percent to 4.9 percent are projected in nearly a quarter of the states.

Not everyone is as optimistic about state budgets in the coming year. This new report contrasts sharply with a study from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, which earlier this summer found that 31 states faced budget gaps in 2012, and that states face a combined $55 billion shortfall for 2013. However, if the NCSL findings are correct, this is very good news for states that have had to resort to midyear cuts and tax increases to balance budgets in the post-recession years.

If states can more easily meet their constitutionally required balanced budgets this year, policymakers should take this opportunity to look at their long-run debt challenges. As I wrote in a USA Today op ed last week, state debt levels are headed to levels that will threaten economic growth. Mounting interest costs will also mean that tax dollars increasingly go to pay for past services, rather than current services.

Whether or not states are in a better position for avoiding deficits in the current year, they need to address their debt levels for long run economic growth. Outspending current revenues is a constant temptation for elected officials who want to stay in office through public support of state programs. However, voters should demand responsible fiscal policy to address debt problems now, before this becomes even more difficult to do down the road.

New Edition of Rich States, Poor States out this Week

The fifth edition of Rich States, Poor States  from the American Legislative Exchange Council is now available. Utah took the top spot in the ranking of states’ economic competitiveness, as it has every year the study has been produced. Utah excels in the ranking system because it is a right-to-work state, it has a flat personal income tax, and no estate tax, among other factors considered in the study.

The other states that round out the top ten for Economic Outlook include South Dakota, Virginia, Wyoming, North Dakota, Idaho, Missouri, Colorado, Arizona, and Georgia. On the bottom end of the ranking, the states with the worst Economic Outlook are Hawaii, Maine, Illinois, Vermont, and New York at number 50 for the fourth year in a row.

Several measures of economic competitiveness offer supporting evidence that these states have some of the worst policies for business including Mercatus’ Freedom in the 50 States and the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index.

The authors of Rich States, Poor States, Arthur Laffer, Stephen Moore, and Jonathan Williams demonstrate Tiebout Competition in action. They find a strong correlation between the states that have high Economic Outlook rankings with the states that are experiencing the highest population growth through domestic migration. Likewise, the states that experienced the largest losses due to out-migration include Ohio and New York, ranking 37th and 50th respectively.

The study draws attention to the role that unfunded pension liabilities play for states’ future competitiveness, as this debt will require difficult and unpopular policy decisions as current tax dollars have to be used to fund past promises. Laffer, Moore, and Williams draw a comparison between Wisconsin’s recent reforms that put it on a more sustainable path compared to its neighbor Illinois:

In stark contrast to Wisconsin’s successes, the story in Illinois is not so uplifting. Over the last 10 years, Illinois legislators have continuously ignored the pension burden in their state—so much so that Illinois has one of the worst pension systems in the nation, with an estimated unfunded liability ranging from $54 billion to $192 billion, depending on your actuarial assumptions. Furthermore, the official state estimates do not include the $17.8 billion in pension obligation bond payments that are owed. In addition, Illinois policymakers have spent beyond their means, borrowed money they don’t have, and made promises to public employee unions that they cannot fulfill. Not only did Illinois face significant unfunded pension liabilities, but also lawmakers had to confront large deficits and potential cuts to state programs.

While the policies that improve state economic competitiveness are clear, the path to achieving them is difficult after voters grow accustomed to programs that their states cannot afford. However the bitter medicine of reform is worthwhile, as we know that economic freedom is not only better for business, but evidence shows it also improves individuals’ well-being.

Local Governments in the United States

From an article in Stateline:

There are 89,476 local governments in the United States. They include counties, cities, villages, towns and townships, as well as special districts that handle utilities, fire, police and library services.

The authors of this article look at the number of local governments in each state relative to its population, finding that the average for the United States is 3,451 people per unit of local government. North Dakota (249), South Dakota (411), and Nebraska (687) were on low end of the spectrum whereas Hawaii (71,595), Maryland (22,553) and Virginia (15,658) where on the high end.

Illinois, in particular, finds itself in an interesting situation in this data. Although the state has only 1,835 people per unit of local government, its total number of local governments (6,944) is far greater than any other state. To put this into perspective, Pennsylvania (4,871) and Texas (4,835) rank second and third, respectively, for states with the highest number of local governments.

So what explains the proliferation of local governments in Illinois? One likely cause is a debt loophole in the state’s constitution. Specifically, the 1870 Illinois Constitution limited the amount of debt that a unit of local government could issue but allowed localities a dodge: the special district. In other words, each unit of local government was allowed to get around its legal debt limit via the creation of a special district. Since that time, the state has created 3,249 special districts. This phenomenon of special district creation as tool for expanded fiscal reach is investigated by Bennett and DiLorenzo in their book, Underground Government.

Does Illinois’s situation suggest the need for consolidation? If so, what is the optimal number of governments for a state to have and how is this determined? It’s not necessarily obvious at first glance: what are these governments, how did they arise, what do they do, and how do they finance their operations?

The concept of consolidating governments to increase efficiency has been the root of much debate in public policy. However, as Ostrom, Tiebout, and Warren argue,

It would be a mistake to conclude that public organizations are of an inappropriate size until the informal mechanisms, which might permit larger or smaller political communities, are investigated.

Thus, when debating over whether or not consolidation will increase efficiency, it’s necessary to understand the institutional environment in which the units of local government were created as well as the underlying informal mechanisms connecting them.

Unions sue New Jersey over pension changes (and a Judge files a separate lawsuit)

In response to the New Jersey legislature’s June pension reforms, New Jersey’s unions have sued the state. The move is not unexpected. Similar actions were taken by unions in Minnesota, Colorado and North Dakota over proposed COLA reductions.

Unfortunately, New Jersey’s pension system is in seriously bad shape and slated to run out of assets to pay out pension promises by the end of the decade. The reasons for this have been discussed many times before. First, is the fundamental misvaluation of pension liabilities, the systematic under-contribution that flows from that and policy choices such as pension holidays, skipped payments and benefit enhancements. To fund pensions according to Joshua Rauh, New Jersey would require the largest per household increase in contributions at $2,475 per household, per year.

In a new paper to be posted soon, my co-author Roman Hardgrave and I take a deeper look at New Jersey’s public employee benefit bill on a local basis. When fully accounting for pension promises, OPEB and other benefits the cost of compensation on the local level is far greater than is recognized.

In the case of Colorado and Minnesota the unions’ suit was thrown out on the grounds that there is no specific right to the COLA. How will the NJ court decide on formula changes and the COLA freeze? Interestingly, a N.J. Superior Court judge has also filed a lawsuit against the state. He says the new law should not apply to judges since the N.J. Constitution says judges’ pay, “shall not be diminished during their term of appointment.”

 

What Caused the State Budget Gaps?

I know the conventional answer: the recession. And surely there is validity to the conventional answer. The recession was the proximate cause: it sent revenues in a free fall at the same time that it put extra demands on the states’ welfare systems.

But the budget gaps were pretty different from state to state. For example, California faced a 2010 budget gap that was 65 percent of its General Fund while North Dakota faced no budget gap at all. Might differences in state policy and differences in state institutions explain the vast difference in gap size? This was the motivation for my recent working paper, State Budget Gaps and State Budget Growth.

In it, I conclude that large gaps were the result of rapid growth in per capita spending, a lack of economic freedom, and weak balanced budget rules.

To arrive at this conclusion, I performed a series of statistical tests, focusing on the size of state budget gaps, measured as a share of state general funds. In these tests, I controlled for various factors that might influence the size of a state’s gap (its population, income level, demographic makeup, etc.). After controlling for these factors, I was able to estimate the impact of certain policy choices and institutions on the size of states’ budget gaps. In particular, I focused on:

  • Budget size relative to state income,
  • Growth in per capita spending in the two decades preceding the recession,
  • Levels of economic freedom, and
  • Stringency of state balanced budget requirements.

I found that states that spent a large share of state income—and have done so for many decades—had smaller (percentage) deficits. This may be because states grow accustomed to making their budgets balance or it may be because the same factors that permit steady revenue streams also permit large budgets. But this doesn’t mean policymakers should go on spending sprees and expect smaller budget gaps. In fact, a spending spree is likely to make a state’s budget gap worse. Other factors being equal, states whose per capita spending increased the most in the two decades preceding the recession had budget gaps that were nearly 20 percentage points larger than states whose per capita spending increased the least. Since the median state’s budget gap was 23 percent of its general fund, going from the slowest to the fastest-growing state can make a huge difference.

Economic freedom (characterized by low taxes and minimal regulation) makes an even greater difference. Using Jason Sorens and William Ruger’s measure of economic freedom, I found that other factors being equal, the most-economically free states tended to have budget gaps that were 25 percentage points smaller than the least-free states.

Lastly, states with weak balanced budget requirements had larger budget gaps. While every state but Vermont is required to balance its budget, some requirements are weaker than others. It turns out that those states with weak balanced budget requirements encountered larger deficits to begin with: theirs were 8 to 10 percentage points larger than those with strong balanced budget requirements.

So what caused the budget gaps? Policy makers may be all-too-happy to pin the blame on the recession. But my research suggests that policy choices in the decades preceding the recession made a big difference. Rapid growth in per capita spending, a lack of economic freedom, and weak balanced budget rules caused the gaps. The recession just exposed these underlying problems.

Legal Plunder

How does law enforcement finance operations? Increasingly, police departments across the country pay for their activities, equipment and supplies by seizing the assets of people who have never committed a crime. It’s a process called civil forfeiture, and it’s at best, controversial. At worst, it provides direct monetary incentive for states and the federal government to steal property from innocent citizens. Gives a whole new meaning to Bastiat’s “legal plunder.”

Radley Balko explains how civil forfeiture perverts the “protect and serve” motto by introducing a profit motive: Continue reading

Is the U.S. Senate Obsolete?

Syndicated columnist Neal Pierce has been writing about state and local affairs since at lease the 1970s. In a recent column, he asks, “Are State Governments Obsolete?” It might have been more appropriate to ask whether state governments actually exist — at least in the traditional constitutional sense. Blessed by the Supreme Court and other judicial rulings, state governments have become administrative appendages of the federal government.

In one area after another in the twentieth century — matters of transportation, public health, land use control, education, wildlife management, etc. — the federal government assumed powers that had traditionally been reserved to the states. States might still have an administrative role, but they are now working under a very tight federal leash.

The sweeping environmental laws of the 1970s shifted control over clean air and water to the federal government. The states were, to be sure, left to administer air and water pollution laws day to day but under federally approved programs, leaving real control in federal hands. The Endangered Species Act not only federalized significant parts of wildlife management but also asserted federal authority over large areas of state and local land use. No Child Left Behind moved a large step towards the full federalization of education in the United States.

Continue reading

Disparities in Stimulus Funding

The Wall Street Journal reports on significant disparities in the amount of stimulus funding that different states are receiving:

Some of the states worst hit by the recession are getting far less federal economic-stimulus money per person than states faring better.

Nevada, where unemployment stood at about 10% when the plan was passed, is getting $541 for each resident from the stimulus money allocated so far, a Wall Street Journal analysis found. Wyoming, where the 3.9% jobless rate was the lowest in the country in February, is getting $1,074 per person.

Florida, North Carolina and Oregon are among the other states with relatively low per-capita payouts, despite battling double-digit unemployment. North Dakota and South Dakota, meanwhile, are also receiving large quantities of stimulus money relative to their small populations — even while unemployment remains about half the national average.