Tag Archives: regulatory costs

Environmental Injustice at the EPA

This past week, the EPA’s science advisory board held a public hearing on efforts to measure the “environmental justice” (EJ) impacts of EPA rules. EJ refers to adverse human health and environmental effects of government policies on minority and low income populations in the US. The EPA has released draft guidance to agency analysts who measure these effects, and this hearing was intended to find ways to improve the guidance before it is finalized.

While holding a public hearing is a sign that the EPA is committed to getting this issue right, significant improvements need to be made to the EJ guidance if the EPA does not want the entire EJ project to backfire. Specifically, closer attention should be paid to the costs EPA rules impose on low income and minority populations. Further, improvements in the transparency of agency procedures will help ensure that those with modest incomes are allowed to participate in decisions that will have significant impacts on their health and well-being.

Currently, the EPA is focusing far more on the benefits of its rules to low income and minority groups than on the costs. As evidence, the 81-page draft guidance document contains only two pages related to costs of EPA regulations. In those two pages, the agency argues that costs are often not relevant to environmental justice issues, saying:

Consideration of the distribution of costs in the context of EJ is not always necessary. Often the costs of regulation are passed onto consumers as higher prices that are spread fairly evenly across many households.

This is a striking statement because regulatory costs are regressive exactly in the instances that the EPA describes in this statement. Any time costs of a policy are spread evenly across all citizens, the dollar amount paid to implement a regulation consumes a larger percentage of a poor person’s income than a wealthy person’s income. This is precisely why sales taxes are regressive.

Additionally, as incomes fall due to the costs imposed on citizens complying with regulations, people have fewer resources available to use toward risk reduction and outlays related to improving health. Meanwhile, there is evidence that private risk reduction can be much more effective than public methods of risk reduction, especially when regulations are addressing very small risks that are dwarfed by the other risks individuals face in their everyday lives.

A step in the right direction would be to ask analysts to identify the distribution of costs of EPA regulations, especially for rules that increase the prices of products that EJ populations purchase (e.g. rent, fuel, food, electricity).

Another important component of EJ is to gather meaningful feedback from low income and minority persons before implementing policies. The notice announcing last week’s public hearing was published in the Federal Register on Christmas Eve, making it unlikely that many in the EJ community, especially those with little political influence and low alertness to EPA actions, will even be aware this hearing is taking place, let alone will participate in the event.

If the EPA’s science advisory board is truly committed to improving the lot of the less well-off, it should tell the EPA to do more to measure the costs of environmental rules on low income and minority persons, and to improve transparency of agency procedures so those with less political clout can participate equally in the democratic process.

Do “Indirect Effects” of Regulation Matter to Real People?

Congressional regulatory reformers recently caught criticism from advocacy groups for introducing legislation that would require federal regulatory agencies to analyze the “indirect effects” of proposed regulations. The only thing I’d criticize the reformers for is poor word choice.

The very term “indirect effects” suggests that they’re talking about something theoretical, inconsequential, and unimportant to the average citizen. But to economists, the indirect effects of a regulation are often the effects that touch the average citizen most directly.

Consider airport security, for example. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently sought public comment on its decision to deploy Advanced Imaging Technology scanners instead of metal detectors at airports. The direct costs of this decision are the extra cost of the new machines, the electricity to run them, and the personnel to staff them – which airline passengers pay for via the taxes and fees on airline tickets. Those are pretty obvious costs, and DHS dutifully toted up these costs in its analysis of its proposed rule.

Less obvious but potentially more important are the other, indirect costs associated with airport security. Passengers who decline to walk through the new machines will receive additional pat-downs. This involves a cost in terms of time (which DHS acknowledges) and potentially diminished privacy and human dignity (which DHS does not discuss). The now-classic phrase “Don’t touch my junk” aptly summarizes one passenger’s reaction to an indirect effect of security regulation that touches passengers quite directly.

But that does not exhaust the list of significant, predictable, indirect effects associated with airport security regulation. The increased delays associated with enhanced, post-9/11 security measures prompted some travelers to substitute driving for flying on short trips. An article by Garrick Blalock, Vrinda Kadiyali, and Daniel H. Simon published in the November 2007 Journal of Law & Economics estimates that post-9/11 security measures cost the airline industry $1.1 billion in lost revenue in the fourth quarter of 2002. Driving is also riskier than flying. Blalock et. al. estimated that the security measures were associated with 129 additional highway deaths in the fourth quarter of 2002.

I’m all for making air travel as safe as possible, but I’d like to see it done smartly, with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of respect for the flying public who pays the bills. A full accounting of the indirect effects of airport security might just prompt policymakers to consider whether they are pursuing regulatory goals in the most sensible way possible.

Unfortunately, airport security is not an isolated example. Data from the Mercatus Center’s Regulatory Report Card reveal that for about 40 percent of the major regulations proposed by executive branch agencies between 2008 and 2012, the agencies failed to conduct any substantial analysis of costs that stem from the proposed regulation’s effects on prices or on human behavior – two classic types of indirect effects.

This won’t do. Telling federal agencies they do not need to understand the indirect effects of regulation is telling them they should proceed in willful ignorance of the effects of their decisions on real people. The reformers have a good idea here – even if it has a misleadingly boring name.