Tag Archives: Scott Beaulier

Reforming State and Local Pension Plans

The Government Accountability Office recently issued a report that provides a nice analysis on the changes that have been taking place in state and local pension plans over the past few years. According to the GAO’s tabulations, the following reforms have been implemented since 2008:

 • Reducing benefits: 35 states have reduced pension benefits, mostly for future employees due to legal provisions protecting benefits for current employees and retirees. A few states, like Colorado, have reduced post-retirement benefit increases for all members and beneficiaries of their pension plans.

• Increasing member contributions: Half of the states have increased member contributions, thereby shifting a larger share of pension costs to employees.

• Switching to a hybrid approach: Georgia, Michigan, and Utah recently implemented hybrid approaches, which incorporate a defined contribution plan component, shifting some investment risk to employees.

The reforms listed in this report seem to indicate that some states and localities are taking a step in the right direction in regards to pension reform. There is, however, a lot more work that needs to be done. One reform, for example, that we need to see more of is shifting public sector pensions from defined benefit to defined contribution plans (see Scott Beaulier’s recent paper for more on this topic). As the GAO report points out, roughly 78 percent of state and local employees participated in defined benefit plans in 2011 – compared to 18 percent of private sector employees.

Another important topic that this report touches on is the discount rate debate. That is, whether or not states should base the discount rate on the expected return of plan assets or on relevant interest rates in the bond market (Eileen Norcross has done some valuable research on this topic here and here).

 

New Medicaid Case Study Highlights the Role of Politics in Policy

Last week, Scott Beaulier and Brandon Pizzola released new research on Medicaid, conducting case studies of five states that have implemented reform measures designed to control program costs. They find that the political climate is essential to the success of reforms.

Medicaid is a cost driver in state budgets for several reasons, but an important factor is that most states have designed the program so that a formula determines the amount of federal money they receive based on state-level Medicaid spending. Reforms which move to essentially a block grant program, as implemented in Rhode Island and Washington, have so far successfully reduced Medicaid spending by eliminating this incentive. These two states have moved to a system where the federal government pledges a fixed yearly amount toward their Medicaid spending. If the full amount is not spent, the remainder can be transferred to the general fund. This reverses the incentive from spending as much as possible to searching for cost savings. Both states have also introduced measures of individual patient responsibility, requiring, for example, that Medicaid recipients do not rely on emergency rooms for routine care. While it is too soon to tell if Rhode Island and Washington will manage to control costs in the long run, both states appear to have achieved improved incentive structures for doing so.

These states passed reform bills not by making a gradual transition to new policies, but by moving decisively. In contrast, Florida lawmakers attempted to test reforms in two counties before expanding them to apply to the rest of the state. This time lag served as an opportunity for interest groups to block further changes. Rhode Island and Washington developed support from these interest groups by framing the issue as the state against the federal government rather than one of winners and losers within the state. In Tennessee reform has not been successful because key interest groups like the Tennessee Medical Association did not get behind proposed reforms, making them unworkable in practice.

Despite the apparent successes in Rhode Island and Washington, the federalism research that Ben and Eileen explored last week reveals that block grants are not a panacea. Block grants, like all intergovernmental spending, carry with them fiscal illusion. This obfuscates program costs to taxpayers by spreading the funding across multiple layers of government. While moving from a matching funds formula to a block grant is an improvement in transparency, total spending is still obscured. Furthermore, while neither state has failed to keep spending within the the budgeted block grant so far, it’s hardly inconceivable that program costs will outpace grants at some point, leading states to seek bailouts after implementing reforms.

The demonstrated reasons to be pessimistic about the viability of programs whose costs are shared across state and federal governments leave reason to question whether or not block grants are successful tools for curbing costs in the long run. However, Rhode Island and Washington have chosen a path that is at least more sustainable than other states, which face incentives to increase Medicaid spending with no limit in sight.

AEI-Mercatus pension panel addresses need for reform

Yesterday Eileen Norcross participated in a panel discussion that was co-hosted by the American Enterprise Institute and the Mercatus Center. The event included two panels, one discussing the case for pension reform, and the second discussing the politics of reform for conservatives.

Eileen participated on the first panel, joined by Scott Beaulier of Troy University and Jason Richwine of the Heritage Foundation. They covered several points of the importance of pension reform, including the necessity for fund managers to use the correct discount rate when determining the pension liability, the importance of upholding fiduciary responsibility to workers and retirees, and the reality that public employee pensions are overly generous compared to private sector compensation.

Drawing on their previous research in pension reform, the panelists made a convincing case for the need for a shift away from defined benefit public pensions. Unfortunately, none were particularly optimistic that drastic reform measures will be undertaken. Scott pointed to Utah as a model states relative to others for responsible pension fund management but said that even their reforms do not go nearly far enough.